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Chapter 20 146 absence. If the poor abbe had not been in such a hurry, he might have had his requiem." "Pooh, pooh;" said the doctor, with the impiety usual in persons of his profession; "he is a churchman. God will respect his profession, and not give the devil the wicked delight of sending him a priest." A shout of laughter followed this brutal jest. Meanwhile the operation of putting the body in the sack was going on. "This evening," said the governor, when the task was ended. "At what hour?" inquired a turnkey. "Why, about ten or eleven o'clock." "Shall we watch by the corpse?" "Of what use would it be? Shut the dungeon as if he were alive -- that is all." Then the steps retreated, and the voices died away in the distance; the noise of the door, with its creaking hinges and bolts ceased, and a silence more sombre than that of solitude ensued, -- the silence of death, which was all-pervasive, and struck its icy chill to the very soul of Dantes. Then he raised the flag-stone cautiously with his head, and looked carefully around the chamber. It was empty, and Dantes emerged from the tunnel. Chapter 20 The Cemetery of the Chateau D'If. On the bed, at full length, and faintly illuminated by the pale light that came from the window, lay a sack of canvas, and under its rude folds was stretched a long and stiffened form; it was Faria's last winding-sheet, -- a winding-sheet which, as the turnkey said, cost so little. Everything was in readiness. A barrier had been placed between Dantes and his old friend. No longer could Edmond look into those wide-open eyes which had seemed to be penetrating the mysteries of death; no longer could he clasp the hand which had done so much to make his existence blessed. Faria, the beneficent and cheerful companion, with whom he was accustomed to live so intimately, no longer breathed. He seated himself on the edge of that terrible bed, and fell into melancholy and gloomy revery. Alone -- he was alone again -- again condemned to silence -- again face to face with nothingness! Alone! -- never again to see the face, never again to hear the voice of the only human being who united him to earth! Was not Faria's fate the better, after all -- to solve the problem of life at its source, even at the risk of horrible suffering? The idea of suicide, which his friend had driven away and kept away by his cheerful presence, now hovered like a phantom over the abbe's dead body. "If I could die," he said, "I should go where he goes, and should assuredly find him again. But how to die? It is very easy," he went on with a smile; "I will remain here, rush on the first person that opens the door, strangle him, and then they will guillotine me." But excessive grief is like a storm at sea, where the frail bark is tossed from the depths to the top of the wave. Dantes recoiled from the idea of so infamous a death, and passed suddenly from despair to an ardent desire for life and liberty. "Die? oh, no," he exclaimed -- "not die now, after having lived and suffered so long and so much! Die? yes, had I died years ago; but now to die would be, indeed, to give way to the sarcasm of destiny. No, I want to live; I shall struggle to the very last; I will yet win back the happiness of which I have been deprived. Before I 时时彩大底抽取软件Chapter 34 257 "Yes, your excellency; but if your reason for inquiry is that you may procure a window to view it from, you are much too late." "Oh, no," answered Franz, "I had no such intention; and even if I had felt a wish to witness the spectacle, I might have done so from Monte Pincio -- could I not?" "Ah!" exclaimed mine host, "I did not think it likely your excellency would have chosen to mingle with such a rabble as are always collected on that hill, which, indeed, they consider as exclusively belonging to themselves." "Very possibly I may not go," answered Franz; "but in case I feel disposed, give me some particulars of to-day's executions." "What particulars would your excellency like to hear?" "Why, the number of persons condemned to suffer, their names, and description of the death they are to die." "That happens just lucky, your excellency! Only a few minutes ago they brought me the tavolettas." "What are they?" "Sort of wooden tablets hung up at the corners of streets the evening before an execution, on which is pasted up a paper containing the names of the condemned persons, their crimes, and mode of punishment. The reason for so publicly announcing all this is, that all good and faithful Catholics may offer up their prayers for the unfortunate culprits, and, above all, beseech of heaven to grant them a sincere repentance." "And these tablets are brought to you that you may add your prayers to those of the faithful, are they?" asked Franz somewhat incredulously. "Oh, dear, no, your excellency! I have not time for anybody's affairs but my own and those of my honorable guests; but I make an agreement with the man who pastes up the papers, and he brings them to me as he would the playbills, that in case any person staying at my hotel should like to witness an execution, he may obtain every requisite information concerning the time and place etc." "Upon my word, that is a most delicate attention on your part, Signor Pastrini," cried Franz. "Why, your excellency," returned the landlord, chuckling and rubbing his hands with infinite complacency, "I think I may take upon myself to say I neglect nothing to deserve the support and patronage of the noble visitors to this poor hotel." "I see that plainly enough, my most excellent host, and you may rely upon me to proclaim so striking a proof of your attention to your guests wherever I go. Meanwhile, oblige me by a sight of one of these tavolettas." "Nothing can be easier than to comply with your excellency's wish," said the landlord, opening the door of the chamber; "I have caused one to be placed on the landing, close by your apartment." Then, taking the tablet from the wall, he handed it to Franz, who read as follows: -- "`The public is informed that on Wednesday, February 23d, being the first day of the Carnival, executions will take place in the Piazza del Popolo, by order of the Tribunal of the Rota, of two persons, named Andrea Rondola, and Peppino, otherwise called Rocca Priori; the former found guilty of the murder of a venerable and exemplary priest, named Don Cesare Torlini, canon of the church of St. John Lateran; and the latter convicted of being an accomplice of the atrocious and sanguinary bandit, Luigi Vampa, and his band. The %E7%AC%AC%E5%8D%81%E4%BA%94%E6%9D%A1++%E4%BA%BA%E8%BA%AB%E4%BF%9D%E9%99%A9%E5%85%AC%E5%8F%B8%E6%8A%AB%E9%9C%B2%E7%9A%84%E4%BA%A7%E5%93%81%E7%BB%8F%E8%90%A5%E4%BF%A1%E6%81%AF%E5%BA%94%E5%BD%93%E5%8C%85%E6%8B%AC%E4%B8%8B%E5%88%97%E5%86%85%E5%AE%B9%EF%BC%9A%EF%BC%88%E4%B8%80%EF%BC%89%E4%B8%8A%E4%B8%80%E5%B9%B4%E5%BA%A6%E5%8E%9F%E4%BF%9D%E9%99%A9%E4%BF%9D%E8%B4%B9%E6%94%B6%E5%85%A5%E5%B1%85%E5%89%8D5%E4%BD%8D%E7%9A%84%E4%BF%9D%E9%99%A9%E4%BA%A7%E5%93%81%E7%9A%84%E5%90%8D%E7%A7%B0%E3%80%81%E4%B8%BB%E8%A6%81%E9%94%80%E5%94%AE%E6%B8%A0%E9%81%93%E3%80%81%E5%8E%9F%E4%BF%9D%E9%99%A9%E4%BF%9D%E8%B4%B9%E6%94%B6%E5%85%A5%E5%92%8C%E9%80%80%E4%BF%9D%E9%87%91%EF%BC%9B 时时彩平台是怎么盈利的Chapter 21 153 "Yes," said he, "I made a vow, to our Lady of the Grotto not to cut my hair or beard for ten years if I were saved in a moment of danger; but to-day the vow expires." "Now what are we to do with you?" said the captain. "Alas, anything you please. My captain is dead; I have barely escaped; but I am a good sailor. Leave me at the first port you make; I shall be sure to find employment." "Do you know the Mediterranean?" "I have sailed over it since my childhood." "You know the best harbors?" "There are few ports that I could not enter or leave with a bandage over my eyes." "I say, captain," said the sailor who had cried "Courage!" to Dantes, "if what he says is true, what hinders his staying with us?" "If he says true," said the captain doubtingly. "But in his present condition he will promise anything, and take his chance of keeping it afterwards." "I will do more than I promise," said Dantes. "We shall see," returned the other, smiling. "Where are you going?" asked Dantes. "To Leghorn." "Then why, instead of tacking so frequently, do you not sail nearer the wind?" "Because we should run straight on to the Island of Rion." "You shall pass it by twenty fathoms." "Take the helm, and let us see what you know." The young man took the helm, felt to see if the vessel answered the rudder promptly and seeing that, without being a first-rate sailer, she yet was tolerably obedient, -- "To the sheets," said he. The four seamen, who composed the crew, obeyed, while the pilot looked on. "Haul taut." -- They obeyed. "Belay." This order was also executed; and the vessel passed, as Dantes had predicted, twenty fathoms to windward. "Bravo!" said the captain. "Bravo!" repeated the sailors. And they all looked with astonishment at this man whose eye now disclosed an intelligence and his body a vigor they had not thought him capable of showing. "You see," said Dantes, quitting the helm, "I shall be of some use to you, at least during the voyage. If you do

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Chapter 45 343 "It was, your excellency; the benevolent abbe took an evident interest in all that concerned me. "`Your mode of life as a smuggler,' said he to me one day, `will be the ruin of you; if you get out, don't take it up again.' -- `But how,' inquired I, `am I to maintain myself and my poor sister?' "`A person, whose confessor I am,' replied he, `and who entertains a high regard for me, applied to me a short time since to procure him a confidential servant. Would you like such a post? If so, I will give you a letter of introduction to him.' -- `Oh, father,' I exclaimed, `you are very good.' "`But you must swear solemnly that I shall never have reason to repent my recommendation.' I extended my hand, and was about to pledge myself by any promise he would dictate, but he stopped me. `It is unnecessary for you to bind yourself by any vow,' said he; `I know and admire the Corsican nature too well to fear you. Here, take this,' continued he, after rapidly writing the few lines I brought to your excellency, and upon receipt of which you deigned to receive me into your service, and proudly I ask whether your excellency has ever had cause to repent having done so?" "No," replied the count; "I take pleasure in saying that you have served me faithfully, Bertuccio; but you might have shown more confidence in me." "I, your excellency?" "Yes; you. How comes it, that having both a sister and an adopted son, you have never spoken to me of either?" "Alas, I have still to recount the most distressing period of my life. Anxious as you may suppose I was to behold and comfort my dear sister, I lost no time in hastening to Corsica, but when I arrived at Rogliano I found a house of mourning, the consequences of a scene so horrible that the neighbors remember and speak of it to this day. Acting by my advice, my poor sister had refused to comply with the unreasonable demands of Benedetto, who was continually tormenting her for money, as long as he believed there was a sou left in her possession. One morning that he had demanded money, threatening her with the severest consequences if she did not supply him with what he desired, he disappeared and remained away all day, leaving the kind-hearted Assunta, who loved him as if he were her own child, to weep over his conduct and bewail his absence. Evening came, and still, with all the patient solicitude of a mother, she watched for his return. "As the eleventh hour struck, he entered with a swaggering air, attended by two of the most dissolute and reckless of his boon companions. She stretched out her arms to him, but they seized hold of her, and one of the three -- none other than the accursed Benedetto exclaimed, -- `Put her to torture and she'll soon tell us where her money is.' "It unfortunately happened that our neighbor, Vasilio, was at Bastia, leaving no person in his house but his wife; no human creature beside could hear or see anything that took place within our dwelling. Two held poor Assunta, who, unable to conceive that any harm was intended to her, smiled in the face of those who were soon to become her executioners. The third proceeded to barricade the doors and windows, then returned, and the three united in stifling the cries of terror incited by the sight of these preparations, and then dragged Assunta feet foremost towards the brazier, expecting to wring from her an avowal of where her supposed treasure was secreted. In the struggle her clothes caught fire, and they were obliged to let go their hold in order to preserve themselves from sharing the same fate. Covered with flames, Assunta rushed wildly to the door, but it was fastened; she flew to the windows, but they were also secured; then the neighbors heard frightful shrieks; it was Assunta calling for help. The cries died away in groans, and next morning, as soon as Vasilio's wife could muster up courage to venture abroad, she caused the door of our dwelling to be opened by the public authorities, when Assunta, although dreadfully burnt, was found still breathing; every drawer and closet in the house had been forced open, and the money stolen. Benedetto never again appeared at Rogliano, 最近上传时时彩后三做号视频Chapter 40 305 "Rail on, rail on at your ease, gentlemen," said Morcerf, somewhat piqued. "When I look at you Parisians, idlers on the Boulevard de Gand or the Bois de Boulogne, and think of this man, it seems to me we are not of the same race." "I am highly flattered," returned Beauchamp. "At the same time," added Chateau-Renaud, "your Count of Monte Cristo is a very fine fellow, always excepting his little arrangements with the Italian banditti." "There are no Italian banditti," said Debray. "No vampire," cried Beauchamp. "No Count of Monte Cristo" added Debray. "There is half-past ten striking, Albert." "Confess you have dreamed this, and let us sit down to breakfast," continued Beauchamp. But the sound of the clock had not died away when Germain announced, "His excellency the Count of Monte Cristo." The involuntary start every one gave proved how much Morcerf's narrative had impressed them, and Albert himself could not wholly refrain from manifesting sudden emotion. He had not heard a carriage stop in the street, or steps in the ante-chamber; the door had itself opened noiselessly. The count appeared, dressed with the greatest simplicity, but the most fastidious dandy could have found nothing to cavil at in his toilet. Every article of dress -- hat, coat, gloves, and boots -- was from the first makers. He seemed scarcely five and thirty. But what struck everybody was his extreme resemblance to the portrait Debray had drawn. The count advanced, smiling, into the centre of the room, and approached Albert, who hastened towards him holding out his hand in a ceremonial manner. "Punctuality," said Monte Cristo, "is the politeness of kings, according to one of your sovereigns, I think; but it is not the same with travellers. However, I hope you will excuse the two or three seconds I am behindhand; five hundred leagues are not to be accomplished without some trouble, and especially in France, where, it seems, it is forbidden to beat the postilions." "My dear count," replied Albert, "I was announcing your visit to some of my friends, whom I had invited in consequence of the promise you did me the honor to make, and whom I now present to you. They are the Count of Chateau-Renaud, whose nobility goes back to the twelve peers, and whose ancestors had a place at the Round Table; M. Lucien Debray, private secretary to the minister of the interior; M. Beauchamp, an editor of a paper, and the terror of the French government, but of whom, in spite of his national celebrity, you perhaps have not heard in Italy, since his paper is prohibited there; and M. Maximilian Morrel, captain of Spahis." At this name the count, who had hitherto saluted every one with courtesy, but at the same time with coldness and formality, stepped a pace forward, and a slight tinge of red colored his pale cheeks. "You wear the uniform of the new French conquerors, monsieur," said he; "it is a handsome uniform." No one could have said what caused the count's voice to vibrate so deeply, and what made his eye flash, which was in general so clear, lustrous, and limpid when he pleased. "You have never seen our Africans, count?" said Albert. "Never," replied the count, who was by this time perfectly master of himself again. "Well, beneath this uniform beats one of the bravest and noblest hearts in the whole army." "Oh, M. de Morcerf," interrupted Morrel. "Let me go on, captain. And we have just heard," continued Albert, "of a new deed of his, and so heroic a one, that, although I have seen him to-day for the first time, I request you to allow me to introduce him as my friend." At these words it was still possible to observe in Monte Cristo the concentrated look, changing color, and slight trembling of the eyelid that show emotion. "Ah, you have a noble heart," said the count; "so much the better." This exclamation, which corresponded to the count's own thought rather than to what Albert was saying, surprised everybody, and especially Morrel, who looked at Monte Cristo with wonder. But, at the same time, the intonation was so soft that, however strange the speech might seem, it was impossible to be -- Page 151-- 天津彩票时时彩开奖96Chapter 17 123 "He was supercargo." "And had you been captain, should you have retained him in his employment?" "Not if the choice had remained with me, for I had frequently observed inaccuracies in his accounts." "Good again! Now then, tell me, was any person present during your last conversation with Captain Leclere?" "No; we were quite alone." "Could your conversation have been overheard by any one?" "It might, for the cabin door was open -- and -- stay; now I recollect, -- Danglars himself passed by just as Captain Leclere was giving me the packet for the grand marshal." "That's better," cried the abbe; "now we are on the right scent. Did you take anybody with you when you put into the port of Elba?" "Nobody." "Somebody there received your packet, and gave you a letter in place of it, I think?" "Yes; the grand marshal did." "And what did you do with that letter?" "Put it into my portfolio." "You had your portfolio with you, then? Now, how could a sailor find room in his pocket for a portfolio large enough to contain an official letter?" "You are right; it was left on board." "Then it was not till your return to the ship that you put the letter in the portfolio?" "No." "And what did you do with this same letter while returning from Porto-Ferrajo to the vessel?" "I carried it in my hand." "So that when you went on board the Pharaon, everybody could see that you held a letter in your hand?" "Yes." "Danglars, as well as the rest?" "Danglars, as well as others." "Now, listen to me, and try to recall every circumstance attending your arrest. Do you recollect the words in which the information against you was formulated?"

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-- Page 342-- 时时彩混双软件Chapter 15 108 Dantes carefully collected the plaster, carried it into the corner of his cell, and covered it with earth. Then, wishing to make the best use of his time while he had the means of labor, he continued to work without ceasing. At the dawn of day he replaced the stone, pushed his bed against the wall, and lay down. The breakfast consisted of a piece of bread; the jailer entered and placed the bread on the table. "Well, don't you intend to bring me another plate?" said Dantes. "No," replied the turnkey; "you destroy everything. First you break your jug, then you make me break your plate; if all the prisoners followed your example, the government would be ruined. I shall leave you the saucepan, and pour your soup into that. So for the future I hope you will not be so destructive." Dantes raised his eyes to heaven and clasped his hands beneath the coverlet. He felt more gratitude for the possession of this piece of iron than he had ever felt for anything. He had noticed, however, that the prisoner on the other side had ceased to labor; no matter, this was a greater reason for proceeding -- if his neighbor would not come to him, he would go to his neighbor. All day he toiled on untiringly, and by the evening he had succeeded in extracting ten handfuls of plaster and fragments of stone. When the hour for his jailer's visit arrived, Dantes straightened the handle of the saucepan as well as he could, and placed it in its accustomed place. The turnkey poured his ration of soup into it, together with the fish -- for thrice a week the prisoners were deprived of meat. This would have been a method of reckoning time, had not Dantes long ceased to do so. Having poured out the soup, the turnkey retired. Dantes wished to ascertain whether his neighbor had really ceased to work. He listened -- all was silent, as it had been for the last three days. Dantes sighed; it was evident that his neighbor distrusted him. However, he toiled on all the night without being discouraged; but after two or three hours he encountered an obstacle. The iron made no impression, but met with a smooth surface; Dantes touched it, and found that it was a beam. This beam crossed, or rather blocked up, the hole Dantes had made; it was necessary, therefore, to dig above or under it. The unhappy young man had not thought of this. "O my God, my God!" murmured he, "I have so earnestly prayed to you, that I hoped my prayers had been heard. After having deprived me of my liberty, after having deprived me of death, after having recalled me to existence, my God, have pity on me, and do not let me die in despair!" "Who talks of God and despair at the same time?" said a voice that seemed to come from beneath the earth, and, deadened by the distance, sounded hollow and sepulchral in the young man's ears. Edmond's hair stood on end, and he rose to his knees. "Ah," said he, "I hear a human voice." Edmond had not heard any one speak save his jailer for four or five years; and a jailer is no man to a prisoner -- he is a living door, a barrier of flesh and blood adding strength to restraints of oak and iron. "In the name of heaven," cried Dantes, "speak again, though the sound of your voice terrifies me. Who are you?" "Who are you?" said the voice. "An unhappy prisoner," replied Dantes, who made no hesitation in answering. "Of what country?" "A Frenchman." "Your name?" "Edmond Dantes." %E4%B8%AD%E5%9B%BD%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E7%9B%91%E7%9D%A3%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E5%A7%94%E5%91%98%E4%BC%9A%E5%8E%A6%E9%97%A8%E7%9B%91%E7%AE%A1%E5%B1%80%E4%B8%AD%E5%9B%BD%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E7%9B%91%E7%9D%A3%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E5%A7%94%E5%91%98%E4%BC%9A%E9%9D%92%E5%B2%9B%E7%9B%91%E7%AE%A1%E5%B1%80%E4%B8%AD%E5%9B%BD%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E7%9B%91%E7%9D%A3%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E5%A7%94%E5%91%98%E4%BC%9A%E6%B7%B1%E5%9C%B3%E7%9B%91%E7%AE%A1%E5%B1%80 广东时时彩11选5\\\\Chapter 6 54 "Then all he has got to do is to endeavor to repair it." "Nay, madame, the law is frequently powerless to effect this; all it can do is to avenge the wrong done." "Oh, M. de Villefort," cried a beautiful young creature, daughter to the Comte de Salvieux, and the cherished friend of Mademoiselle de Saint-Meran, "do try and get up some famous trial while we are at Marseilles. I never was in a law-court; I am told it is so very amusing!" "Amusing, certainly," replied the young man, "inasmuch as, instead of shedding tears as at the fictitious tale of woe produced at a theatre, you behold in a law-court a case of real and genuine distress -- a drama of life. The prisoner whom you there see pale, agitated, and alarmed, instead of -- as is the case when a curtain falls on a tragedy -- going home to sup peacefully with his family, and then retiring to rest, that he may recommence his mimic woes on the morrow, -- is removed from your sight merely to be reconducted to his prison and delivered up to the executioner. I leave you to judge how far your nerves are calculated to bear you through such a scene. Of this, however, be assured, that should any favorable opportunity present itself, I will not fail to offer you the choice of being present." "For shame, M. de Villefort!" said Renee, becoming quite pale; "don't you see how you are frightening us? -- and yet you laugh." "What would you have? 'Tis like a duel. I have already recorded sentence of death, five or six times, against the movers of political conspiracies, and who can say how many daggers may be ready sharpened, and only waiting a favorable opportunity to be buried in my heart?" "Gracious heavens, M. de Villefort," said Renee, becoming more and more terrified; "you surely are not in earnest." "Indeed I am," replied the young magistrate with a smile; "and in the interesting trial that young lady is anxious to witness, the case would only be still more aggravated. Suppose, for instance, the prisoner, as is more than probable, to have served under Napoleon -- well, can you expect for an instant, that one accustomed, at the word of his commander, to rush fearlessly on the very bayonets of his foe, will scruple more to drive a stiletto into the heart of one he knows to be his personal enemy, than to slaughter his fellow-creatures, merely because bidden to do so by one he is bound to obey? Besides, one requires the excitement of being hateful in the eyes of the accused, in order to lash one's self into a state of sufficient vehemence and power. I would not choose to see the man against whom I pleaded smile, as though in mockery of my words. No; my pride is to see the accused pale, agitated, and as though beaten out of all composure by the fire of my eloquence." Renee uttered a smothered exclamation. "Bravo!" cried one of the guests; "that is what I call talking to some purpose." "Just the person we require at a time like the present," said a second. "What a splendid business that last case of yours was, my dear Villefort!" remarked a third; "I mean the trial of the man for murdering his father. Upon my word, you killed him ere the executioner had laid his hand upon him." "Oh, as for parricides, and such dreadful people as that," interposed Renee, "it matters very little what is done to them; but as regards poor unfortunate creatures whose only crime consists in having mixed themselves up in political intrigues" -- "Why, that is the very worst offence they could possibly commit; for, don't you see, Renee, the king is the father of his people, and he who shall plot or contrive aught against the life and safety of the parent of

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-- Page 77-- 六盘水马拉松比赛冠军Chapter 4 37 "What?" "I would stab the man, but the woman told me that if any misfortune happened to her betrothed, she would kill herself." "Pooh! Women say those things, but never do them." "You do not know Mercedes; what she threatens she will do." "Idiot!" muttered Danglars; "whether she kill herself or not, what matter, provided Dantes is not captain?" "Before Mercedes should die," replied Fernand, with the accents of unshaken resolution, "I would die myself!" "That's what I call love!" said Caderousse with a voice more tipsy than ever. "That's love, or I don't know what love is." "Come," said Danglars, "you appear to me a good sort of fellow, and hang me, I should like to help you, but" -- "Yes," said Caderousse, "but how?" "My dear fellow," replied Danglars, "you are three parts drunk; finish the bottle, and you will be completely so. Drink then, and do not meddle with what we are discussing, for that requires all one's wit and cool judgment." "I -- drunk!" said Caderousse; "well that's a good one! I could drink four more such bottles; they are no bigger than cologne flasks. Pere Pamphile, more wine!" and Caderousse rattled his glass upon the table. "You were saying, sir" -- said Fernand, awaiting with great anxiety the end of this interrupted remark. "What was I saying? I forget. This drunken Caderousse has made me lose the thread of my sentence." "Drunk, if you like; so much the worse for those who fear wine, for it is because they have bad thoughts which they are afraid the liquor will extract from their hearts;" and Caderousse began to sing the two last lines of a song very popular at the time, -- `Tous les mechants sont beuveurs d'eau; C'est bien prouve par le deluge.'* * "The wicked are great drinkers of water As the flood proved once for all." "You said, sir, you would like to help me, but" -- "Yes; but I added, to help you it would be sufficient that Dantes did not marry her you love; and the marriage may easily be thwarted, methinks, and yet Dantes need not die." "Death alone can separate them," remarked Fernand. "You talk like a noodle, my friend," said Caderousse; "and here is Danglars, who is a wide-awake, clever, deep fellow, who will prove to you that you are wrong. Prove it, Danglars. I have answered for you. Say there is no need why Dantes should die; it would, indeed, be a pity he should. Dantes is a good fellow; I like Dantes. Dantes, your health." -- Page 57-- 时时彩软件使用教程Chapter 38 291 have lost your senses." "Whether I am in my senses or not," answered Franz, "that is the way I feel." "Listen to me, Franz," said Albert; "I am glad that the occasion has presented itself for saying this to you, for I have noticed how cold you are in your bearing towards the count, while he, on the other hand, has always been courtesy itself to us. Have you anything particular against him?" "Possibly." "Did you ever meet him previously to coming hither?" "I have." "And where?" "Will you promise me not to repeat a single word of what I am about to tell you?" "I promise." "Upon your honor?" "Upon my honor." "Then listen to me." Franz then related to his friend the history of his excursion to the Island of Monte Cristo and of his finding a party of smugglers there, and the two Corsican bandits with them. He dwelt with considerable force and energy on the almost magical hospitality he had received from the count, and the magnificence of his entertainment in the grotto of the "Thousand and One Nights." He recounted, with circumstantial exactitude, all the particulars of the supper, the hashish, the statues, the dream, and how, at his awakening, there remained no proof or trace of all these events, save the small yacht, seen in the distant horizon driving under full sail toward Porto-Vecchio. Then he detailed the conversation overheard by him at the Colosseum, between the count and Vampa, in which the count had promised to obtain the release of the bandit Peppino, -- an engagement which, as our readers are aware, he most faithfully fulfilled. At last he arrived at the adventure of the preceding night, and the embarrassment in which he found himself placed by not having sufficient cash by six or seven hundred piastres to make up the sum required, and finally of his application to the count and the picturesque and satisfactory result that followed. Albert listened with the most profound attention. "Well," said he, when Franz had concluded, "what do you find to object to in all you have related? The count is fond of travelling, and, being rich, possesses a vessel of his own. Go but to Portsmouth or Southampton, and you will find the harbors crowded with the yachts belonging to such of the English as can afford the expense, and have the same liking for this amusement. Now, by way of having a resting-place during his excursions, avoiding the wretched cookery -- which has been trying its best to poison me during the last four months, while you have manfully resisted its effects for as many years, -- and obtaining a bed on which it is possible to slumber, Monte Cristo has furnished for himself a temporary abode where you first found him; but, to prevent the possibility of the Tuscan government taking a fancy to his enchanted palace, and thereby depriving him of the advantages naturally expected from so large an outlay of capital, he has wisely enough purchased the island, and taken its name. Just ask yourself, my good fellow, whether there are not many persons of our acquaintance who assume the names of lands and properties they never in their lives were masters of?" "But," said Franz, "the Corsican bandits that were among the crew of his vessel?" "Why, really the thing seems to me simple enough. Nobody knows better than yourself that the bandits of

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However, as if fate resolved on depriving the prisoners of their last chance, and making them understand that they were condemned to perpetual imprisonment, a new misfortune befell them; the gallery on the sea side, which had long been in ruins, was rebuilt. They had repaired it completely, and stopped up with vast masses of stone the hole Dantes had partly filled in. But for this precaution, which, it will be remembered, the abbe had made to Edmond, the misfortune would have been still greater, for their attempt to escape would have been detected, and they would undoubtedly have been separated. Thus a new, a stronger, and more inexorable barrier was interposed to cut off the realization of their hopes. "You see," said the young man, with an air of sorrowful resignation, to Faria, "that God deems it right to take from me any claim to merit for what you call my devotion to you. I have promised to remain forever with you, and now I could not break my promise if I would. The treasure will be no more mine than yours, and neither of us will quit this prison. But my real treasure is not that, my dear friend, which awaits me beneath the sombre rocks of Monte Cristo, it is your presence, our living together five or six hours a day, in spite of our jailers; it is the rays of intelligence you have elicited from my brain, the languages you have implanted in my memory, and which have taken root there with all their philological ramifications. These different sciences that you have made so easy to me by the depth of the knowledge you possess of them, and the clearness of the principles to which you have reduced them -- this is my treasure, my beloved friend, and with this you have made me rich and happy. Believe me, and take comfort, this is better for me than tons of gold and cases of diamonds, even were they not as problematical as the clouds we see in the morning floating over the sea, which we take for terra firma, and which evaporate and vanish as we draw near to them. To have you as long as possible near me, to hear your eloquent speech, -- which embellishes my mind, strengthens my soul, and makes my whole frame capable of great and terrible things, if I should ever be free, -- so fills my whole existence, that the despair to which I was just on the point of yielding when I knew you, has no longer any hold over me; and this -- this is my fortune -- not chimerical, but actual. I owe you my real good, my present happiness; and all the sovereigns of the earth, even Caesar Borgia himself, could not deprive me of this." Thus, if not actually happy, yet the days these two unfortunates passed together went quickly. Faria, who for so long a time had kept silence as to the treasure, now perpetually talked of it. As he had prophesied would be the case, he remained paralyzed in the right arm and the left leg, and had given up all hope of ever enjoying it himself. But he was continually thinking over some means of escape for his young companion, and anticipating the pleasure he would enjoy. For fear the letter might be some day lost or stolen, he compelled Dantes to learn it by heart; and Dantes knew it from the first to the last word. Then he destroyed the second portion, assured that if the first were seized, no one would be able to discover its real meaning. Whole hours sometimes passed while Faria was giving instructions to Dantes, -- instructions which were to serve him when he was at liberty. Then, once free, from the day and hour and moment when he was so, he could have but one only thought, which was, to gain Monte Cristo by some means, and remain there alone under some pretext which would arouse no suspicions; and once there, to endeavor to find the wonderful caverns, and search in the appointed spot, -- the appointed spot, be it remembered, being the farthest angle in the second opening. In the meanwhile the hours passed, if not rapidly, at least tolerably. Faria, as we have said, without having recovered the use of his hand and foot, had regained all the clearness of his understanding, and had gradually, besides the moral instructions we have detailed, taught his youthful companion the patient and sublime duty of a prisoner, who learns to make something from nothing. They were thus perpetually employed, -- Faria, that he might not see himself grow old; Dantes, for fear of recalling the almost extinct past which now only floated in his memory like a distant light wandering in the night. So life went on for them as it does for those who are not victims of misfortune and whose activities glide along mechanically and tranquilly beneath the eye of providence. But beneath this superficial calm there were in the heart of the young man, and perhaps in that of the old man, -- Page 184-- 时时彩源码搭建视频-- Page 198--



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Chapter 40 299 "Do not say that, Debray," returned Beauchamp, laughing, "for here is Chateau-Renaud, who, to cure you of your mania for paradoxes, will pass the sword of Renaud de Montauban, his ancestor, through your body." "He will sully it then," returned Lucien; "for I am low -- very low." "Oh, heavens," cried Beauchamp, "the minister quotes Beranger, what shall we come to next?" "M. de Chateau-Renaud -- M. Maximilian Morrel," said the servant, announcing two fresh guests. "Now, then, to breakfast," said Beauchamp; "for, if I remember, you told me you only expected two persons, Albert." "Morrel," muttered Albert -- "Morrel -- who is he?" But before he had finished, M. de Chateau-Renaud, a handsome young man of thirty, gentleman all over, -- that is, with the figure of a Guiche and the wit of a Mortemart, -- took Albert's hand. "My dear Albert," said he, "let me introduce to you M. Maximilian Morrel, captain of Spahis, my friend; and what is more -- however the man speaks for himself ---my preserver. Salute my hero, viscount." And he stepped on one side to give place to a young man of refined and dignified bearing, with large and open brow, piercing eyes, and black mustache, whom our readers have already seen at Marseilles, under circumstances sufficiently dramatic not to be forgotten. A rich uniform, half French, half Oriental, set off his graceful and stalwart figure, and his broad chest was decorated with the order of the Legion of Honor. The young officer bowed with easy and elegant politeness. "Monsieur," said Albert with affectionate courtesy, "the count of Chateau-Renaud knew how much pleasure this introduction would give me; you are his friend, be ours also." "Well said," interrupted Chateau-Renaud; "and pray that, if you should ever be in a similar predicament, he may do as much for you as he did for me." "What has he done?" asked Albert. "Oh, nothing worth speaking of," said Morrel; "M. de Chateau-Renaud exaggerates." "Not worth speaking of?" cried Chateau-Renaud; "life is not worth speaking of! -- that is rather too philosophical, on my word, Morrel. It is very well for you, who risk your life every day, but for me, who only did so once" -- "We gather from all this, baron, that Captain Morrel saved your life." "Exactly so." "On what occasion?" asked Beauchamp. "Beauchamp, my good fellow, you know I am starving," said Debray: "do not set him off on some long story." "Well, I do not prevent your sitting down to table," replied Beauchamp, "Chateau-Renaud can tell us while we eat our breakfast." "Gentlemen," said Morcerf, "it is only a quarter past ten, and I expect some one else." "Ah, true, a diplomatist!" observed Debray. "Diplomat or not, I don't know; I only know that he charged himself on my account with a mission, which he terminated so entirely to my satisfaction, that had I been king, I should have instantly created him knight of all 老时时彩骗局%E7%AC%AC%E5%9B%9B%E6%9D%A1%09%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E9%87%91%E8%9E%8D%E6%9C%BA%E6%9E%84%E5%AF%B9%E6%9C%AC%E6%9C%BA%E6%9E%84%E4%BB%8E%E4%B8%9A%E4%BA%BA%E5%91%98%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%BA%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E6%89%BF%E6%8B%85%E4%B8%BB%E4%BD%93%E8%B4%A3%E4%BB%BB%E3%80%82%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E9%87%91%E8%9E%8D%E6%9C%BA%E6%9E%84%E5%BA%94%E5%8A%A0%E5%BC%BA%E5%AF%B9%E4%BB%8E%E4%B8%9A%E4%BA%BA%E5%91%98%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%BA%E7%9A%84%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%EF%BC%8C%E4%BD%BF%E5%85%B6%E4%BF%9D%E6%8C%81%E8%89%AF%E5%A5%BD%E7%9A%84%E8%81%8C%E4%B8%9A%E6%93%8D%E5%AE%88%EF%BC%8C%E8%AF%9A%E5%AE%9E%E5%AE%88%E4%BF%A1%E3%80%81%E5%8B%A4%E5%8B%89%E5%B0%BD%E8%B4%A3%EF%BC%8C%E5%9D%9A%E6%8C%81%E4%BE%9D%E6%B3%95%E7%BB%8F%E8%90%A5%E3%80%81%E5%90%88%E8%A7%84%E6%93%8D%E4%BD%9C%EF%BC%8C%E9%81%B5%E5%AE%88%E5%B7%A5%E4%BD%9C%E7%BA%AA%E5%BE%8B%E5%92%8C%E4%BF%9D%E5%AF%86%E5%8E%9F%E5%88%99%EF%BC%8C%E4%B8%A5%E6%A0%BC%E6%89%A7%E8%A1%8C%E5%BB%89%E6%B4%81%E4%BB%8E%E4%B8%9A%E7%9A%84%E5%90%84%E9%A1%B9%E8%A7%84%E5%AE%9A%E3%80%82 -- Page 267-- 玩时时彩盈利15万Chapter 34 257 "Yes, your excellency; but if your reason for inquiry is that you may procure a window to view it from, you are much too late." "Oh, no," answered Franz, "I had no such intention; and even if I had felt a wish to witness the spectacle, I might have done so from Monte Pincio -- could I not?" "Ah!" exclaimed mine host, "I did not think it likely your excellency would have chosen to mingle with such a rabble as are always collected on that hill, which, indeed, they consider as exclusively belonging to themselves." "Very possibly I may not go," answered Franz; "but in case I feel disposed, give me some particulars of to-day's executions." "What particulars would your excellency like to hear?" "Why, the number of persons condemned to suffer, their names, and description of the death they are to die." "That happens just lucky, your excellency! Only a few minutes ago they brought me the tavolettas." "What are they?" "Sort of wooden tablets hung up at the corners of streets the evening before an execution, on which is pasted up a paper containing the names of the condemned persons, their crimes, and mode of punishment. The reason for so publicly announcing all this is, that all good and faithful Catholics may offer up their prayers for the unfortunate culprits, and, above all, beseech of heaven to grant them a sincere repentance." "And these tablets are brought to you that you may add your prayers to those of the faithful, are they?" asked Franz somewhat incredulously. "Oh, dear, no, your excellency! I have not time for anybody's affairs but my own and those of my honorable guests; but I make an agreement with the man who pastes up the papers, and he brings them to me as he would the playbills, that in case any person staying at my hotel should like to witness an execution, he may obtain every requisite information concerning the time and place etc." "Upon my word, that is a most delicate attention on your part, Signor Pastrini," cried Franz. "Why, your excellency," returned the landlord, chuckling and rubbing his hands with infinite complacency, "I think I may take upon myself to say I neglect nothing to deserve the support and patronage of the noble visitors to this poor hotel." "I see that plainly enough, my most excellent host, and you may rely upon me to proclaim so striking a proof of your attention to your guests wherever I go. Meanwhile, oblige me by a sight of one of these tavolettas." "Nothing can be easier than to comply with your excellency's wish," said the landlord, opening the door of the chamber; "I have caused one to be placed on the landing, close by your apartment." Then, taking the tablet from the wall, he handed it to Franz, who read as follows: -- "`The public is informed that on Wednesday, February 23d, being the first day of the Carnival, executions will take place in the Piazza del Popolo, by order of the Tribunal of the Rota, of two persons, named Andrea Rondola, and Peppino, otherwise called Rocca Priori; the former found guilty of the murder of a venerable and exemplary priest, named Don Cesare Torlini, canon of the church of St. John Lateran; and the latter convicted of being an accomplice of the atrocious and sanguinary bandit, Luigi Vampa, and his band. The



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Chapter 6 57 "True; but that gentleman being absent, his secretary, by his orders, opened his letters; thinking this one of importance, he sent for me, but not finding me, took upon himself to give the necessary orders for arresting the accused party." "Then the guilty person is absolutely in custody?" said the marquise. "Nay, dear mother, say the accused person. You know we cannot yet pronounce him guilty." "He is in safe custody," answered Villefort; "and rely upon it, if the letter is found, he will not be likely to be trusted abroad again, unless he goes forth under the especial protection of the headsman." "And where is the unfortunate being?" asked Renee. "He is at my house." "Come, come, my friend," interrupted the marquise, "do not neglect your duty to linger with us. You are the king's servant, and must go wherever that service calls you." "O Villefort!" cried Renee, clasping her hands, and looking towards her lover with piteous earnestness, "be merciful on this the day of our betrothal." The young man passed round to the side of the table where the fair pleader sat, and leaning over her chair said tenderly, -- "To give you pleasure, my sweet Renee, I promise to show all the lenity in my power; but if the charges brought against this Bonapartist hero prove correct, why, then, you really must give me leave to order his head to be cut off." Renee shuddered. "Never mind that foolish girl, Villefort," said the marquise. "She will soon get over these things." So saying, Madame de Saint-Meran extended her dry bony hand to Villefort, who, while imprinting a son-in-law's respectful salute on it, looked at Renee, as much as to say, "I must try and fancy 'tis your dear hand I kiss, as it should have been." "These are mournful auspices to accompany a betrothal," sighed poor Renee. "Upon my word, child!" exclaimed the angry marquise, "your folly exceeds all bounds. I should be glad to know what connection there can possibly be between your sickly sentimentality and the affairs of the state!" "O mother!" murmured Renee. "Nay, madame, I pray you pardon this little traitor. I promise you that to make up for her want of loyalty, I will be most inflexibly severe;" then casting an expressive glance at his betrothed, which seemed to say, "Fear not, for your dear sake my justice shall be tempered with mercy," and receiving a sweet and approving smile in return, Villefort quitted the room. 重庆时时彩 机器人-- Page 40-- Chapter 36 273 pleased him above all, for the fair peasants had appeared in a most elegant carriage the preceding evening, and Albert was not sorry to be upon an equal footing with them. At half-past one they descended, the coachman and footman had put on their livery over their disguises, which gave them a more ridiculous appearance than ever, and which gained them the applause of Franz and Albert. Albert had fastened the faded bunch of violets to his button-hole. At the first sound of the bell they hastened into the Corso by the Via Vittoria. At the second turn, a bunch of fresh violets, thrown from a carriage filled with harlequins, indicated to Albert that, like himself and his friend, the peasants had changed their costume, also; and whether it was the result of chance, or whether a similar feeling had possessed them both, while he had changed his costume they had assumed his. Albert placed the fresh bouquet in his button-hole, but he kept the faded one in his hand; and when he again met the calash, he raised it to his lips, an action which seemed greatly to amuse not only the fair lady who had thrown it, but her joyous companions also. The day was as gay as the preceding one, perhaps even more animated and noisy; the count appeared for an instant at his window. but when they again passed he had disappeared. It is almost needless to say that the flirtation between Albert and the fair peasant continued all day. In the evening, on his return, Franz found a letter from the embassy, informing him that he would have the honor of being received by his holiness the next day. At each previous visit he had made to Rome, he had solicited and obtained the same favor; and incited as much by a religious feeling as by gratitude, he was unwilling to quit the capital of the Christian world without laying his respectful homage at the feet of one of St. Peter's successors who has set the rare example of all the virtues. He did not then think of the Carnival, for in spite of his condescension and touching kindness, one cannot incline one's self without awe before the venerable and noble old man called Gregory XVI. On his return from the Vatican, Franz carefully avoided the Corso; he brought away with him a treasure of pious thoughts, to which the mad gayety of the maskers would have been profanation. At ten minutes past five Albert entered overjoyed. The harlequin had reassumed her peasant's costume, and as she passed she raised her mask. She was charming. Franz congratulated Albert, who received his congratulations with the air of a man conscious that they are merited. He had recognized by certain unmistakable signs, that his fair incognita belonged to the aristocracy. He had made up his mind to write to her the next day. Franz remarked, while he gave these details, that Albert seemed to have something to ask of him, but that he was unwilling to ask it. He insisted upon it, declaring beforehand that he was willing to make any sacrifice the other wished. Albert let himself be pressed just as long as friendship required, and then avowed to Franz that he would do him a great favor by allowing him to occupy the carriage alone the next day. Albert attributed to Franz's absence the extreme kindness of the fair peasant in raising her mask. Franz was not sufficiently egotistical to stop Albert in the middle of an adventure that promised to prove so agreeable to his curiosity and so flattering to his vanity. He felt assured that the perfect indiscretion of his friend would duly inform him of all that happened; and as, during three years that he had travelled all over Italy, a similar piece of good fortune had never fallen to his share, Franz was by no means sorry to learn how to act on such an occasion. He therefore promised Albert that he would content himself the morrow with witnessing the Carnival from the windows of the Rospoli Palace. The next morning he saw Albert pass and repass, holding an enormous bouquet, which he doubtless meant to make the bearer of his amorous epistle. This belief was changed into certainty when Franz saw the bouquet (conspicuous by a circle of white camellias) in the hand of a charming harlequin dressed in rose-colored satin. The evening was no longer joy, but delirium. Albert nothing doubted but that the fair unknown would reply in the same manner. Franz anticipated his wishes by saying that the noise fatigued him, and that he should pass the next day in writing and looking over his journal. Albert was not deceived, for the next evening Franz saw him enter triumphantly shaking a folded paper which he held by one corner. "Well," said he, "was I mistaken?" "She has answered you!" cried Franz. "Read." This word was pronounced in a manner impossible to describe. Franz took the letter, and read: -- 时时彩后一单双方案-- Page 265--



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-- Page 57-- 玩重庆时时彩犯法-- Page 328-- Chapter 40 312 everything as I wish. He knows my tastes, my caprices, my wants. He has been here a week, with the instinct of a hound, hunting by himself. He will arrange everything for me. He knew, that I should arrive to-day at ten o'clock; he was waiting for me at nine at the Barriere de Fontainebleau. He gave me this paper; it contains the number of my new abode; read it yourself," and Monte Cristo passed a paper to Albert. "Ah, that is really original," said Beauchamp. "And very princely," added Chateau-Renaud. "What, do you not know your house?" asked Debray. "No," said Monte Cristo; "I told you I did not wish to be behind my time; I dressed myself in the carriage, and descended at the viscount's door." The young men looked at each other; they did not know if it was a comedy Monte Cristo was playing, but every word he uttered had such an air of simplicity, that it was impossible to suppose what he said was false -- besides, why should he tell a falsehood? "We must content ourselves, then," said Beauchamp, "with rendering the count all the little services in our power. I, in my quality of journalist, open all the theatres to him." "Thanks, monsieur," returned Monte Cristo, "my steward has orders to take a box at each theatre." "Is your steward also a Nubian?" asked Debray. "No, he is a countryman of yours, if a Corsican is a countryman of any one's. But you know him, M. de Morcerf." "Is it that excellent M. Bertuccio, who understands hiring windows so well?" "Yes, you saw him the day I had the honor of receiving you; he has been a soldier, a smuggler -- in fact, everything. I would not be quite sure that he has not been mixed up with the police for some trifle -- a stab with a knife, for instance." "And you have chosen this honest citizen for your steward," said Debray. "Of how much does he rob you every year?" "On my word," replied the count, "not more than another. I am sure he answers my purpose, knows no impossibility, and so I keep him." "Then," continued Chateau-Renaud, "since you have an establishment, a steward, and a hotel in the Champs Elysees, you only want a mistress." Albert smiled. He thought of the fair Greek he had seen in the count's box at the Argentina and Valle theatres. "I have something better than that," said Monte Cristo; "I have a slave. You procure your mistresses from the opera, the Vaudeville, or the Varietes; I purchased mine at Constantinople; it cost me more, but I have nothing to fear." "But you forget," replied Debray, laughing, "that we are Franks by name and franks by nature, as King Charles said, and that the moment she puts her foot in France your slave becomes free." "Who will tell her?" "The first person who sees her." "She only speaks Romaic." "That is different." 时时彩拖胆什么意思Chapter 17 119 cell opened; from that point the passage became much narrower, and barely permitted one to creep through on hands and knees. The floor of the abbe's cell was paved, and it had been by raising one of the stones in the most obscure corner that Faria had to been able to commence the laborious task of which Dantes had witnessed the completion. As he entered the chamber of his friend, Dantes cast around one eager and searching glance in quest of the expected marvels, but nothing more than common met his view. "It is well," said the abbe; "we have some hours before us -- it is now just a quarter past twelve o'clock." Instinctively Dantes turned round to observe by what watch or clock the abbe had been able so accurately to specify the hour. "Look at this ray of light which enters by my window," said the abbe, "and then observe the lines traced on the wall. Well, by means of these lines, which are in accordance with the double motion of the earth, and the ellipse it describes round the sun, I am enabled to ascertain the precise hour with more minuteness than if I possessed a watch; for that might be broken or deranged in its movements, while the sun and earth never vary in their appointed paths." This last explanation was wholly lost upon Dantes, who had always imagined, from seeing the sun rise from behind the mountains and set in the Mediterranean, that it moved, and not the earth. A double movement of the globe he inhabited, and of which he could feel nothing, appeared to him perfectly impossible. Each word that fell from his companion's lips seemed fraught with the mysteries of science, as worthy of digging out as the gold and diamonds in the mines of Guzerat and Golconda, which he could just recollect having visited during a voyage made in his earliest youth. "Come," said he to the abbe, "I am anxious to see your treasures." The abbe smiled, and, proceeding to the disused fireplace, raised, by the help of his chisel, a long stone, which had doubtless been the hearth, beneath which was a cavity of considerable depth, serving as a safe depository of the articles mentioned to Dantes. "What do you wish to see first?" asked the abbe. "Oh, your great work on the monarchy of Italy!" Faria then drew forth from his hiding-place three or four rolls of linen, laid one over the other, like folds of papyrus. These rolls consisted of slips of cloth about four inches wide and eighteen long; they were all carefully numbered and closely covered with writing, so legible that Dantes could easily read it, as well as make out the sense -- it being in Italian, a language he, as a Provencal, perfectly understood. "There," said he, "there is the work complete. I wrote the word finis at the end of the sixty-eighth strip about a week ago. I have torn up two of my shirts, and as many handkerchiefs as I was master of, to complete the precious pages. Should I ever get out of prison and find in all Italy a printer courageous enough to publish what I have composed, my literary reputation is forever secured." "I see," answered Dantes. "Now let me behold the curious pens with which you have written your work." "Look!" said Faria, showing to the young man a slender stick about six inches long, and much resembling the size of the handle of a fine painting-brush, to the end of which was tied, by a piece of thread, one of those cartilages of which the abbe had before spoken to Dantes; it was pointed, and divided at the nib like an ordinary pen. Dantes examined it with intense admiration, then looked around to see the instrument with which it had been shaped so correctly into form.
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Chapter 40 302 "We know that," said Beauchamp. "Yes, but what you do not know is that I was carried off by bandits." "There are no bandits," cried Debray. "Yes there are, and most hideous, or rather most admirable ones, for I found them ugly enough to frighten me." "Come, my dear Albert," said Debray, "confess that your cook is behindhand, that the oysters have not arrived from Ostend or Marennes, and that, like Madame de Maintenon, you are going to replace the dish by a story. Say so at once; we are sufficiently well-bred to excuse you, and to listen to your history, fabulous as it promises to be." "And I say to you, fabulous as it may seem, I tell it as a true one from beginning to end. The brigands had carried me off, and conducted me to a gloomy spot, called the Catacombs of Saint Sebastian." "I know it," said Chateau-Renaud; "I narrowly escaped catching a fever there." "And I did more than that," replied Morcerf, "for I caught one. I was informed that I was prisoner until I paid the sum of 4,000 Roman crowns -- about 24,000 francs. Unfortunately, I had not above 1,500. I was at the end of my journey and of my credit. I wrote to Franz -- and were he here he would confirm every word -- I wrote then to Franz that if he did not come with the four thousand crowns before six, at ten minutes past I should have gone to join the blessed saints and glorious martyrs in whose company I had the honor of being; and Signor Luigi Vampa, such was the name of the chief of these bandits, would have scrupulously kept his word." "But Franz did come with the four thousand crowns," said Chateau-Renaud. "A man whose name is Franz d'Epinay or Albert de Morcerf has not much difficulty in procuring them." "No, he arrived accompanied simply by the guest I am going to present to you." "Ah, this gentleman is a Hercules killing Cacus, a Perseus freeing Andromeda." "No, he is a man about my own size." "Armed to the teeth?" "He had not even a knitting-needle." "But he paid your ransom?" "He said two words to the chief and I was free." "And they apologized to him for having carried you off?" said Beauchamp. "Just so." "Why, he is a second Ariosto." "No, his name is the Count of Monte Cristo." 重庆时时彩五星定位胆视频-- Page 28-- Chapter 40 312 everything as I wish. He knows my tastes, my caprices, my wants. He has been here a week, with the instinct of a hound, hunting by himself. He will arrange everything for me. He knew, that I should arrive to-day at ten o'clock; he was waiting for me at nine at the Barriere de Fontainebleau. He gave me this paper; it contains the number of my new abode; read it yourself," and Monte Cristo passed a paper to Albert. "Ah, that is really original," said Beauchamp. "And very princely," added Chateau-Renaud. "What, do you not know your house?" asked Debray. "No," said Monte Cristo; "I told you I did not wish to be behind my time; I dressed myself in the carriage, and descended at the viscount's door." The young men looked at each other; they did not know if it was a comedy Monte Cristo was playing, but every word he uttered had such an air of simplicity, that it was impossible to suppose what he said was false -- besides, why should he tell a falsehood? "We must content ourselves, then," said Beauchamp, "with rendering the count all the little services in our power. I, in my quality of journalist, open all the theatres to him." "Thanks, monsieur," returned Monte Cristo, "my steward has orders to take a box at each theatre." "Is your steward also a Nubian?" asked Debray. "No, he is a countryman of yours, if a Corsican is a countryman of any one's. But you know him, M. de Morcerf." "Is it that excellent M. Bertuccio, who understands hiring windows so well?" "Yes, you saw him the day I had the honor of receiving you; he has been a soldier, a smuggler -- in fact, everything. I would not be quite sure that he has not been mixed up with the police for some trifle -- a stab with a knife, for instance." "And you have chosen this honest citizen for your steward," said Debray. "Of how much does he rob you every year?" "On my word," replied the count, "not more than another. I am sure he answers my purpose, knows no impossibility, and so I keep him." "Then," continued Chateau-Renaud, "since you have an establishment, a steward, and a hotel in the Champs Elysees, you only want a mistress." Albert smiled. He thought of the fair Greek he had seen in the count's box at the Argentina and Valle theatres. "I have something better than that," said Monte Cristo; "I have a slave. You procure your mistresses from the opera, the Vaudeville, or the Varietes; I purchased mine at Constantinople; it cost me more, but I have nothing to fear." "But you forget," replied Debray, laughing, "that we are Franks by name and franks by nature, as King Charles said, and that the moment she puts her foot in France your slave becomes free." "Who will tell her?" "The first person who sees her." "She only speaks Romaic." "That is different." 极速时时彩是哪个部门的彩票-- Page 296--

Chapter 37 282 "To your apartments, perhaps; but he will not make any difficulty at entering mine." The count went to the window of the apartment that looked on to the street, and whistled in a peculiar manner. The man in the mantle quitted the wall, and advanced into the middle of the street. "Salite!" said the count, in the same tone in which he would have given an order to his servant. The messenger obeyed without the least hesitation, but rather with alacrity, and, mounting the steps at a bound, entered the hotel; five seconds afterwards he was at the door of the room. "Ah, it is you, Peppino," said the count. But Peppino, instead of answering, threw himself on his knees, seized the count's hand, and covered it with kisses. "Ah," said the count, "you have, then, not forgotten that I saved your life; that is strange, for it is a week ago." "No, excellency; and never shall I forget it," returned Peppino, with an accent of profound gratitude. "Never? That is a long time; but it is something that you believe so. Rise and answer." Peppino glanced anxiously at Franz. "Oh, you may speak before his excellency," said he; "he is one of my friends. You allow me to give you this title?" continued the count in French, "it is necessary to excite this man's confidence." "You can speak before me," said Franz; "I am a friend of the count's." "Good!" returned Peppino. "I am ready to answer any questions your excellency may address to me." "How did the Viscount Albert fall into Luigi's hands?" "Excellency, the Frenchman's carriage passed several times the one in which was Teresa." "The chief's mistress?" "Yes. The Frenchman threw her a bouquet; Teresa returned it -- all this with the consent of the chief, who was in the carriage." "What?" cried Franz, "was Luigi Vampa in the carriage with the Roman peasants?" "It was he who drove, disguised as the coachman," replied Peppino. "Well?" said the count. "Well, then, the Frenchman took off his mask; Teresa, with the chief's consent, did the same. The Frenchman asked for a rendezvous; Teresa gave him one -- only, instead of Teresa, it was Beppo who was on the steps of the church of San Giacomo." "What!" exclaimed Franz, "the peasant girl who snatched his mocoletto from him" -- "Was a lad of fifteen," replied Peppino. "But it was no disgrace to your friend to have been deceived; Beppo has taken in plenty of others." "And Beppo led him outside the walls?" said the count. "Exactly so; a carriage was waiting at the end of the Via Macello. Beppo got in, inviting the Frenchman to follow him, and he did not wait to be asked twice. He gallantly offered the right-hand seat to Beppo, and sat by him. Beppo told him he was going to take him to a villa a league from Rome; the Frenchman assured him he would follow him to the end of the world. The coachman went up the Via di Ripetta and the Porta San Paola; and when they were two hundred yards outside, as the Frenchman became somewhat too forward, Beppo put a brace of pistols to his head, the coachman pulled up and did the same. At the same time, four of the band, who were concealed on the banks of the Almo, surrounded the carriage. The Frenchman made some 今天安徽碧桂园安全事故%E4%B8%80%E3%80%81%E5%9C%A8%E7%AC%AC%E5%8D%81%E6%9D%A1%E7%AC%AC%E4%B8%89%E6%AC%BE%E5%90%8E%E5%A2%9E%E5%8A%A0%E4%B8%80%E6%AC%BE%E8%A7%84%E5%AE%9A%EF%BC%9A%E2%80%9C%E5%A4%96%E5%95%86%E7%8B%AC%E8%B5%84%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E3%80%81%E4%B8%AD%E5%A4%96%E5%90%88%E8%B5%84%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%BD%9C%E4%B8%BA%E5%8F%91%E8%B5%B7%E4%BA%BA%E6%88%96%E6%88%98%E7%95%A5%E6%8A%95%E8%B5%84%E8%80%85%E5%85%A5%E8%82%A1%E4%B8%AD%E8%B5%84%E5%95%86%E4%B8%9A%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%EF%BC%8C%E5%8F%82%E7%85%A7%E6%9C%AC%E6%9D%A1%E5%85%B3%E4%BA%8E%E5%A2%83%E5%A4%96%E9%87%91%E8%9E%8D%E6%9C%BA%E6%9E%84%E4%BD%9C%E4%B8%BA%E5%8F%91%E8%B5%B7%E4%BA%BA%E6%88%96%E6%88%98%E7%95%A5%E6%8A%95%E8%B5%84%E8%80%85%E5%85%A5%E8%82%A1%E4%B8%AD%E8%B5%84%E5%95%86%E4%B8%9A%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E7%9A%84%E7%9B%B8%E5%85%B3%E8%A7%84%E5%AE%9A%E2%80%9D%E3%80%82 %E7%AC%AC%E4%B8%89%E6%9D%A1++%E4%BF%9D%E9%99%A9%E5%85%AC%E5%8F%B8%E4%BF%A1%E6%81%AF%E6%8A%AB%E9%9C%B2%E5%BA%94%E5%BD%93%E9%81%B5%E5%BE%AA%E7%9C%9F%E5%AE%9E%E3%80%81%E5%87%86%E7%A1%AE%E3%80%81%E5%AE%8C%E6%95%B4%E3%80%81%E5%8F%8A%E6%97%B6%E3%80%81%E6%9C%89%E6%95%88%E7%9A%84%E5%8E%9F%E5%88%99%EF%BC%8C%E4%B8%8D%E5%BE%97%E6%9C%89%E8%99%9A%E5%81%87%E8%AE%B0%E8%BD%BD%E3%80%81%E8%AF%AF%E5%AF%BC%E6%80%A7%E9%99%88%E8%BF%B0%E5%92%8C%E9%87%8D%E5%A4%A7%E9%81%97%E6%BC%8F%E3%80%82 推动形成绿色发展方式和生活方式全文-- Page 199--

-- Page 260-- 重庆时时彩毫模式平台-- Page 203-- Chapter 3 31 "You could do no such thing, Fernand; you are a soldier, and if you remain at the Catalans it is because there is no war; so remain a fisherman, and contented with my friendship, as I cannot give you more." "Well, I will do better, Mercedes. I will be a sailor; instead of the costume of our fathers, which you despise, I will wear a varnished hat, a striped shirt, and a blue jacket, with an anchor on the buttons. Would not that dress please you?" "What do you mean?" asked Mercedes, with an angry glance, -- "what do you mean? I do not understand you?" "I mean, Mercedes, that you are thus harsh and cruel with me, because you are expecting some one who is thus attired; but perhaps he whom you await is inconstant, or if he is not, the sea is so to him." "Fernand," cried Mercedes, "I believed you were good-hearted, and I was mistaken! Fernand, you are wicked to call to your aid jealousy and the anger of God! Yes, I will not deny it, I do await, and I do love him of whom you speak; and, if he does not return, instead of accusing him of the inconstancy which you insinuate, I will tell you that he died loving me and me only." The young girl made a gesture of rage. "I understand you, Fernand; you would be revenged on him because I do not love you; you would cross your Catalan knife with his dirk. What end would that answer? To lose you my friendship if he were conquered, and see that friendship changed into hate if you were victor. Believe me, to seek a quarrel with a man is a bad method of pleasing the woman who loves that man. No, Fernand, you will not thus give way to evil thoughts. Unable to have me for your wife, you will content yourself with having me for your friend and sister; and besides," she added, her eyes troubled and moistened with tears, "wait, wait, Fernand; you said just now that the sea was treacherous, and he has been gone four months, and during these four months there have been some terrible storms." Fernand made no reply, nor did he attempt to check the tears which flowed down the cheeks of Mercedes, although for each of these tears he would have shed his heart's blood; but these tears flowed for another. He arose, paced a while up and down the hut, and then, suddenly stopping before Mercedes, with his eyes glowing and his hands clinched, -- "Say, Mercedes," he said, "once for all, is this your final determination?" "I love Edmond Dantes," the young girl calmly replied, "and none but Edmond shall ever be my husband." "And you will always love him?" "As long as I live." Fernand let fall his head like a defeated man, heaved a sigh that was like a groan, and then suddenly looking her full in the face, with clinched teeth and expanded nostrils, said, -- "But if he is dead" -- "If he is dead, I shall die too." "If he has forgotten you" -- "Mercedes!" called a joyous voice from without, -- "Mercedes!" "Ah," exclaimed the young girl, blushing with delight, and fairly leaping in excess of love, "you see he has not forgotten me, for here he is!" And rushing towards the door, she opened it, saying, "Here, Edmond, here I am!" Fernand, pale and trembling, drew back, like a traveller at the sight of a serpent, and fell into a chair beside him. Edmond and Mercedes were clasped in each other's arms. The burning Marseilles sun, which shot into 守财奴时时彩三星拼五星-- Page 328--

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Chapter 4 38 Fernand rose impatiently. "Let him run on," said Danglars, restraining the young man; "drunk as he is, he is not much out in what he says. Absence severs as well as death, and if the walls of a prison were between Edmond and Mercedes they would be as effectually separated as if he lay under a tombstone." "Yes; but one gets out of prison," said Caderousse, who, with what sense was left him, listened eagerly to the conversation, "and when one gets out and one's name is Edmond Dantes, one seeks revenge" -- "What matters that?" muttered Fernand. "And why, I should like to know," persisted Caderousse, "should they put Dantes in prison? he has not robbed or killed or murdered." "Hold your tongue!" said Danglars. "I won't hold my tongue!" replied Caderousse; "I say I want to know why they should put Dantes in prison; I like Dantes; Dantes, your health!" and he swallowed another glass of wine. Danglars saw in the muddled look of the tailor the progress of his intoxication, and turning towards Fernand, said, "Well, you understand there is no need to kill him." "Certainly not, if, as you said just now, you have the means of having Dantes arrested. Have you that means?" "It is to be found for the searching. But why should I meddle in the matter? it is no affair of mine." "I know not why you meddle," said Fernand, seizing his arm; "but this I know, you have some motive of personal hatred against Dantes, for he who himself hates is never mistaken in the sentiments of others." "I! -- motives of hatred against Dantes? None, on my word! I saw you were unhappy, and your unhappiness interested me; that's all; but since you believe I act for my own account, adieu, my dear friend, get out of the affair as best you may;" and Danglars rose as if he meant to depart. "No, no," said Fernand, restraining him, "stay! It is of very little consequence to me at the end of the matter whether you have any angry feeling or not against Dantes. I hate him! I confess it openly. Do you find the means, I will execute it, provided it is not to kill the man, for Mercedes has declared she will kill herself if Dantes is killed." Caderousse, who had let his head drop on the table, now raised it, and looking at Fernand with his dull and fishy eyes, he said, -- "Kill Dantes! who talks of killing Dantes? I won't have him killed -- I won't! He's my friend, and this morning offered to share his money with me, as I shared mine with him. I won't have Dantes killed -- I won't!" "And who has said a word about killing him, muddlehead?" replied Danglars. "We were merely joking; drink to his health," he added, filling Caderousse's glass, "and do not interfere with us." "Yes, yes, Dantes' good health!" said Caderousse, emptying his glass, "here's to his health! his health -- hurrah!" "But the means -- the means?" said Fernand. "Have you not hit upon any?" asked Danglars. "No! -- you undertook to do so." 时时彩+预测Chapter 6 50 "Perhaps not," replied Danglars; "but I hear that he is ambitious, and that's rather against him." "Well, well," returned M. Morrel, "we shall see. But now hasten on board, I will join you there ere long." So saying, the worthy shipowner quitted the two allies, and proceeded in the direction of the Palais de Justice. "You see," said Danglars, addressing Caderousse, "the turn things have taken. Do you still feel any desire to stand up in his defence?" "Not the slightest, but yet it seems to me a shocking thing that a mere joke should lead to such consequences." "But who perpetrated that joke, let me ask? neither you nor myself, but Fernand; you knew very well that I threw the paper into a corner of the room -- indeed, I fancied I had destroyed it." "Oh, no," replied Caderousse, "that I can answer for, you did not. I only wish I could see it now as plainly as I saw it lying all crushed and crumpled in a corner of the arbor." "Well, then, if you did, depend upon it, Fernand picked it up, and either copied it or caused it to be copied; perhaps, even, he did not take the trouble of recopying it. And now I think of it, by Heavens, he may have sent the letter itself! Fortunately, for me, the handwriting was disguised." "Then you were aware of Dantes being engaged in a conspiracy?" "Not I. As I before said, I thought the whole thing was a joke, nothing more. It seems, however, that I have unconsciously stumbled upon the truth." "Still," argued Caderousse, "I would give a great deal if nothing of the kind had happened; or, at least, that I had had no hand in it. You will see, Danglars, that it will turn out an unlucky job for both of us." "Nonsense! If any harm come of it, it should fall on the guilty person; and that, you know, is Fernand. How can we be implicated in any way? All we have got to do is, to keep our own counsel, and remain perfectly quiet, not breathing a word to any living soul; and you will see that the storm will pass away without in the least affecting us." "Amen!" responded Caderousse, waving his hand in token of adieu to Danglars, and bending his steps towards the Allees de Meillan, moving his head to and fro, and muttering as he went, after the manner of one whose mind was overcharged with one absorbing idea. "So far, then," said Danglars, mentally, "all has gone as I would have it. I am, temporarily, commander of the Pharaon, with the certainty of being permanently so, if that fool of a Caderousse can be persuaded to hold his tongue. My only fear is the chance of Dantes being released. But, there, he is in the hands of Justice; and," added he with a smile, "she will take her own." So saying, he leaped into a boat, desiring to be rowed on board the Pharaon, where M. Morrel had agreed to meet him. Chapter 6 The Deputy Procureur du Roi. -- Page 332-- 重庆时时彩热号图%E4%BF%9D%E9%99%A9%E5%85%AC%E5%8F%B8%E4%BF%A1%E6%81%AF%E6%8A%AB%E9%9C%B2%E5%BA%94%E5%BD%93%E5%B0%BD%E5%8F%AF%E8%83%BD%E4%BD%BF%E7%94%A8%E9%80%9A%E4%BF%97%E6%98%93%E6%87%82%E7%9A%84%E8%AF%AD%E8%A8%80%E3%80%82
-- Page 304-- 给警车贴条会处罚吗%EF%BC%88%E4%B8%89%EF%BC%89%E7%BC%96%E5%88%B6%E6%88%96%E8%80%85%E6%8F%90%E4%BE%9B%E8%99%9A%E5%81%87%E7%9A%84%E6%8A%A5%E5%91%8A%E3%80%81%E6%8A%A5%E8%A1%A8%E3%80%81%E6%96%87%E4%BB%B6%E3%80%81%E8%B5%84%E6%96%99%E7%9A%84%EF%BC%9B%EF%BC%88%E5%9B%9B%EF%BC%89%E6%8B%92%E7%BB%9D%E6%88%96%E8%80%85%E5%A6%A8%E7%A2%8D%E4%BE%9D%E6%B3%95%E7%9B%91%E7%9D%A3%E6%A3%80%E6%9F%A5%E7%9A%84%E3%80%82 Chapter 34 248 Noah in tracing a descent, and a genealogical tree is equally estimated, whether dated from 1399 or merely 1815; but to crown all these advantages, Albert de Morcerf commanded an income of 50,000 livres, a more than sufficient sum to render him a personage of considerable importance in Paris. It was therefore no small mortification to him to have visited most of the principal cities in Italy without having excited the most trifling observation. Albert, however, hoped to indemnify himself for all these slights and indifferences during the Carnival, knowing full well that among the different states and kingdoms in which this festivity is celebrated, Rome is the spot where even the wisest and gravest throw off the usual rigidity of their lives, and deign to mingle in the follies of this time of liberty and relaxation. The Carnival was to commence on the morrow; therefore Albert had not an instant to lose in setting forth the programme of his hopes, expectations, and claims to notice. With this design he had engaged a box in the most conspicuous part of the theatre, and exerted himself to set off his personal attractions by the aid of the most rich and elaborate toilet. The box taken by Albert was in the first circle; although each of the three tiers of boxes is deemed equally aristocratic, and is, for this reason, generally styled the "nobility's boxes," and although the box engaged for the two friends was sufficiently capacious to contain at least a dozen persons, it had cost less than would be paid at some of the French theatres for one admitting merely four occupants. Another motive had influenced Albert's selection of his seat, -- who knew but that, thus advantageously placed, he might not in truth attract the notice of some fair Roman, and an introduction might ensue that would procure him the offer of a seat in a carriage, or a place in a princely balcony, from which he might behold the gayeties of the Carnival? These united considerations made Albert more lively and anxious to please than he had hitherto been. Totally disregarding the business of the stage, he leaned from his box and began attentively scrutinizing the beauty of each pretty woman, aided by a powerful opera-glass; but, alas, this attempt to attract notice wholly failed; not even curiosity had been excited, and it was but too apparent that the lovely creatures, into whose good graces he was desirous of stealing, were all so much engrossed with themselves, their lovers, or their own thoughts, that they had not so much as noticed him or the manipulation of his glass. The truth was, that the anticipated pleasures of the Carnival, with the "holy week" that was to succeed it, so filled every fair breast, as to prevent the least attention being bestowed even on the business of the stage. The actors made their entries and exits unobserved or unthought of; at certain conventional moments, the spectators would suddenly cease their conversation, or rouse themselves from their musings, to listen to some brilliant effort of Moriani's, a well-executed recitative by Coselli, or to join in loud applause at the wonderful powers of La Specchia; but that momentary excitement over, they quickly relapsed into their former state of preoccupation or interesting conversation. Towards the close of the first act, the door of a box which had been hitherto vacant was opened; a lady entered to whom Franz had been introduced in Paris, where indeed, he had imagined she still was. The quick eye of Albert caught the involuntary start with which his friend beheld the new arrival, and, turning to him, he said hastily, "Do you know the woman who has just entered that box?" "Yes; what do you think of her?" "Oh, she is perfectly lovely -- what a complexion! And such magnificent hair! Is she French?" "No; a Venetian." "And her name is -- " "Countess G---- ." "Ah, I know her by name!" exclaimed Albert; "she is said to possess as much wit and cleverness as beauty. I was to have been presented to her when I met her at Madame Villefort's ball." "Shall I assist you in repairing your negligence?" asked Franz. 时时彩计划图片怎么看%E7%AC%AC%E5%8D%81%E5%85%AD%E6%9D%A1%09%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E9%87%91%E8%9E%8D%E6%9C%BA%E6%9E%84%E5%BA%94%E9%80%9A%E8%BF%87%E5%9F%B9%E8%AE%AD%E7%AD%89%E6%96%B9%E5%BC%8F%E5%90%91%E5%85%A8%E4%BD%93%E4%BB%8E%E4%B8%9A%E4%BA%BA%E5%91%98%E6%B8%85%E6%A5%9A%E4%BC%A0%E8%BE%BE%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%BA%E5%AE%88%E5%88%99%E5%8F%8A%E5%85%B6%E7%BB%86%E5%88%99%E7%9A%84%E7%9B%B8%E5%85%B3%E8%A6%81%E6%B1%82%EF%BC%8C%E5%B9%B6%E8%A7%86%E6%83%85%E5%86%B5%E5%BC%80%E5%B1%95%E5%BF%85%E8%A6%81%E7%9A%84%E8%AD%A6%E7%A4%BA%E8%B0%88%E8%AF%9D%E5%92%8C%E9%80%9A%E6%8A%A5%E6%95%99%E8%82%B2%E3%80%82
Chapter 45 341 "Caderousse shuddered. The woman's lips seemed to move, as though she were talking; but because she merely spoke in an undertone, or my senses were dulled by sleep, I did not catch a word she uttered. Confused sights and sounds seemed to float before me, and gradually I fell into a deep, heavy slumber. How long I had been in this unconscious state I know not, when I was suddenly aroused by the report of a pistol, followed by a fearful cry. Weak and tottering footsteps resounded across the chamber above me, and the next instant a dull, heavy weight seemed to fall powerless on the staircase. I had not yet fully recovered consciousness, when again I heard groans, mingled with half-stifled cries, as if from persons engaged in a deadly struggle. A cry more prolonged than the others and ending in a series of groans effectually roused me from my drowsy lethargy. Hastily raising myself on one arm, I looked around, but all was dark; and it seemed to me as if the rain must have penetrated through the flooring of the room above, for some kind of moisture appeared to fall, drop by drop, upon my forehead, and when I passed my hand across my brow, I felt that it was wet and clammy. "To the fearful noises that had awakened me had succeeded the most perfect silence -- unbroken, save by the footsteps of a man walking about in the chamber above. The staircase creaked, he descended into the room below, approached the fire and lit a candle. The man was Caderousse -- he was pale and his shirt was all blood. Having obtained the light, he hurried up-stairs again, and once more I heard his rapid and uneasy footsteps. A moment later he came down again, holding in his hand the small shagreen case, which he opened, to assure himself it contained the diamond, -- seemed to hesitate as to which pocket he should put it in, then, as if dissatisfied with the security of either pocket, he deposited it in his red handkerchief, which he carefully rolled round his head. After this he took from his cupboard the bank-notes and gold he had put there, thrust the one into the pocket of his trousers, and the other into that of his waistcoat, hastily tied up a small bundle of linen, and rushing towards the door, disappeared in the darkness of the night. "Then all became clear and manifest to me, and I reproached myself with what had happened, as though I myself had done the guilty deed. I fancied that I still heard faint moans, and imagining that the unfortunate jeweller might not be quite dead, I determined to go to his relief, by way of atoning in some slight degree, not for the crime I had committed, but for that which I had not endeavored to prevent. For this purpose I applied all the strength I possessed to force an entrance from the cramped spot in which I lay to the adjoining room. The poorly fastened boards which alone divided me from it yielded to my efforts, and I found myself in the house. Hastily snatching up the lighted candle, I hurried to the staircase; about midway a body was lying quite across the stairs. It was that of La Carconte. The pistol I had heard had doubtless been fired at her. The shot had frightfully lacerated her throat, leaving two gaping wounds from which, as well as the mouth, the blood was pouring in floods. She was stone dead. I strode past her, and ascended to the sleeping chamber, which presented an appearance of the wildest disorder. The furniture had been knocked over in the deadly struggle that had taken place there, and the sheets, to which the unfortunate jeweller had doubtless clung, were dragged across the room. The murdered man lay on the floor, his head leaning against the wall, and about him was a pool of blood which poured forth from three large wounds in his breast; there was a fourth gash, in which a long table knife was plunged up to the handle. "I stumbled over some object; I stooped to examine -- it was the second pistol, which had not gone off, probably from the powder being wet. I approached the jeweller, who was not quite dead, and at the sound of my footsteps and the creaking of the floor, he opened his eyes, fixed them on me with an anxious and inquiring gaze, moved his lips as though trying to speak, then, overcome by the effort, fell back and expired. This appalling sight almost bereft me of my senses, and finding that I could no longer be of service to any one in the house, my only desire was to fly. I rushed towards the staircase, clutching my hair, and uttering a groan of horror. Upon reaching the room below, I found five or six custom-house officers, and two or three gendarmes -- all heavily armed. They threw themselves upon me. I made no resistance; I was no longer master of my senses. When I strove to speak, a few inarticulate sounds alone escaped my lips. "As I noticed the significant manner in which the whole party pointed to my blood-stained garments, I involuntarily surveyed myself, and then I discovered that the thick warm drops that had so bedewed me as I 网上赌时时彩被骗Chapter 16 117 "Since my imprisonment," said Faria, "I have thought over all the most celebrated cases of escape on record. They have rarely been successful. Those that have been crowned with full success have been long meditated upon, and carefully arranged; such, for instance, as the escape of the Duc de Beaufort from the Chateau de Vincennes, that of the Abbe Dubuquoi from For l'Eveque; of Latude from the Bastille. Then there are those for which chance sometimes affords opportunity, and those are the best of all. Let us, therefore, wait patiently for some favorable moment, and when it presents itself, profit by it." "Ah," said Dantes, "you might well endure the tedious delay; you were constantly employed in the task you set yourself, and when weary with toil, you had your hopes to refresh and encourage you." "I assure you," replied the old man, "I did not turn to that source for recreation or support." "What did you do then?" "I wrote or studied." "Were you then permitted the use of pens, ink, and paper?" "Oh, no," answered the abbe; "I had none but what I made for myself." "You made paper, pens and ink?" "Yes." Dantes gazed with admiration, but he had some difficulty in believing. Faria saw this. "When you pay me a visit in my cell, my young friend," said he, "I will show you an entire work, the fruits of the thoughts and reflections of my whole life; many of them meditated over in the shades of the Coloseum at Rome, at the foot of St. Mark's column at Venice, and on the borders of the Arno at Florence, little imagining at the time that they would be arranged in order within the walls of the Chateau d'If. The work I speak of is called `A Treatise on the Possibility of a General Monarchy in Italy,' and will make one large quarto volume." "And on what have you written all this?" "On two of my shirts. I invented a preparation that makes linen as smooth and as easy to write on as parchment." "You are, then, a chemist?" "Somewhat; I know Lavoisier, and was the intimate friend of Cabanis." "But for such a work you must have needed books -- had you any?" "I had nearly five thousand volumes in my library at Rome; but after reading them over many times, I found out that with one hundred and fifty well-chosen books a man possesses, if not a complete summary of all human knowledge, at least all that a man need really know. I devoted three years of my life to reading and studying these one hundred and fifty volumes, till I knew them nearly by heart; so that since I have been in prison, a very slight effort of memory has enabled me to recall their contents as readily as though the pages were open before me. I could recite you the whole of Thucydides, Xenophon, Plutarch, Titus Livius, Tacitus, Strada, Jornandes, Dante, Montaigne, Shaksepeare, Spinoza, Machiavelli, and Bossuet. I name only the most important." Chapter 9 73 "I do not know; he is no longer in my hands," replied Villefort. And desirous of putting an end to the interview, he pushed by her, and closed the door, as if to exclude the pain he felt. But remorse is not thus banished; like Virgil's wounded hero, he carried the arrow in his wound, and, arrived at the salon, Villefort uttered a sigh that was almost a sob, and sank into a chair. Then the first pangs of an unending torture seized upon his heart. The man he sacrificed to his ambition, that innocent victim immolated on the altar of his father's faults, appeared to him pale and threatening, leading his affianced bride by the hand, and bringing with him remorse, not such as the ancients figured, furious and terrible, but that slow and consuming agony whose pangs are intensified from hour to hour up to the very moment of death. Then he had a moment's hesitation. He had frequently called for capital punishment on criminals, and owing to his irresistible eloquence they had been condemned, and yet the slightest shadow of remorse had never clouded Villefort's brow, because they were guilty; at least, he believed so; but here was an innocent man whose happiness he had destroyed: in this case he was not the judge, but the executioner. As he thus reflected, he felt the sensation we have described, and which had hitherto been unknown to him, arise in his bosom, and fill him with vague apprehensions. It is thus that a wounded man trembles instinctively at the approach of the finger to his wound until it be healed, but Villefort's was one of those that never close, or if they do, only close to reopen more agonizing than ever. If at this moment the sweet voice of Renee had sounded in his ears pleading for mercy, or the fair Mercedes had entered and said, "In the name of God, I conjure you to restore me my affianced husband," his cold and trembling hands would have signed his release; but no voice broke the stillness of the chamber, and the door was opened only by Villefort's valet, who came to tell him that the travelling carriage was in readiness. Villefort rose, or rather sprang, from his chair, hastily opened one of the drawers of his desk, emptied all the gold it contained into his pocket, stood motionless an instant, his hand pressed to his head, muttered a few inarticulate sounds, and then, perceiving that his servant had placed his cloak on his shoulders, he sprang into the carriage, ordering the postilions to drive to M. de Saint-Meran's. The hapless Dantes was doomed. As the marquis had promised, Villefort found the marquise and Renee in waiting. He started when he saw Renee, for he fancied she was again about to plead for Dantes. Alas, her emotions were wholly personal: she was thinking only of Villefort's departure. She loved Villefort, and he left her at the moment he was about to become her husband. Villefort knew not when he should return, and Renee, far from pleading for Dantes, hated the man whose crime separated her from her lover. Meanwhile what of Mercedes? She had met Fernand at the corner of the Rue de la Loge; she had returned to the Catalans, and had despairingly cast herself on her couch. Fernand, kneeling by her side, took her hand, and covered it with kisses that Mercedes did not even feel. She passed the night thus. The lamp went out for want of oil, but she paid no heed to the darkness, and dawn came, but she knew not that it was day. Grief had made her blind to all but one object -- that was Edmond. "Ah, you are there," said she, at length, turning towards Fernand. "I have not quitted you since yesterday," returned Fernand sorrowfully. M. Morrel had not readily given up the fight. He had learned that Dantes had been taken to prison, and he had gone to all his friends, and the influential persons of the city; but the report was already in circulation that Dantes was arrested as a Bonapartist agent; and as the most sanguine looked upon any attempt of Napoleon to remount the throne as impossible, he met with nothing but refusal, and had returned home in despair, declaring that the matter was serious and that nothing more could be done. 重庆时时彩现场摇奖现场Chapter 29 199 "Well, well," said M. Morrel, "I know there was no one in fault but destiny. It was the will of God that this should happen, blessed be his name. What wages are due to you?" "Oh, don't let us talk of that, M. Morrel." "Yes, but we will talk of it." "Well, then, three months," said Penelon. "Cocles, pay two hundred francs to each of these good fellows," said Morrel. "At another time," added be, "I should have said, Give them, besides, two hundred francs over as a present; but times are changed, and the little money that remains to me is not my own." Penelon turned to his companions, and exchanged a few words with them. "As for that, M. Morrel," said he, again turning his quid, "as for that" -- "As for what?" "The money." "Well" -- "Well, we all say that fifty francs will be enough for us at present, and that we will wait for the rest." "Thanks, my friends, thanks!" cried Morrel gratefully; "take it -- take it; and if you can find another employer, enter his service; you are free to do so." These last words produced a prodigious effect on the seaman. Penelon nearly swallowed his quid; fortunately he recovered. "What, M. Morrel!" said he in a low voice, "you send us away; you are then angry with us!" "No, no," said M. Morrel, "I am not angry, quite the contrary, and I do not send you away; but I have no more ships, and therefore I do not want any sailors." "No more ships!" returned Penelon; "well, then, you'll build some; we'll wait for you." "I have no money to build ships with, Penelon," said the poor owner mournfully, "so I cannot accept your kind offer." "No more money? Then you must not pay us; we can scud, like the Pharaon, under bare poles." "Enough, enough!" cried Morrel, almost overpowered; "leave me, I pray you; we shall meet again in a happier time. Emmanuel, go with them, and see that my orders are executed." "At least, we shall see each other again, M. Morrel?" asked Penelon. "Yes; I hope so, at least. Now go." He made a sign to Cocles, who went first; the seamen followed him and Emmanuel brought up the rear. "Now," said the owner to his wife and daughter, "leave me; I wish to speak with this gentleman." And he glanced towards the clerk of Thomson & French, who had remained motionless in the corner during this scene, in which he had taken no part, except the few words we have mentioned. The two women looked at this person whose presence they had entirely forgotten, and retired; but, as she left the apartment, Julie gave the stranger a supplicating glance, to which he replied by a smile that an indifferent spectator would have been surprised to see on his stern features. The two men were left alone. "Well, sir," said


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Chapter 34 249 "My dear fellow, are you really on such good terms with her as to venture to take me to her box?" "Why, I have only had the honor of being in her society and conversing with her three or four times in my life; but you know that even such an acquaintance as that might warrant my doing what you ask." At that instant, the countess perceived Franz, and graciously waved her hand to him, to which he replied by a respectful inclination of the head. "Upon my word," said Albert, "you seem to be on excellent terms with the beautiful countess." "You are mistaken in thinking so," returned Franz calmly; "but you merely fall into the same error which leads so many of our countrymen to commit the most egregious blunders, -- I mean that of judging the habits and customs of Italy and Spain by our Parisian notions; believe me, nothing is more fallacious than to form any estimate of the degree of intimacy you may suppose existing among persons by the familiar terms they seem upon; there is a similarity of feeling at this instant between ourselves and the countess -- nothing more." "Is there, indeed, my good fellow? Pray tell me, is it sympathy of heart?" "No; of taste," continued Franz gravely. "And in what manner has this congeniality of mind been evinced?" "By the countess's visiting the Colosseum, as we did last night, by moonlight, and nearly alone." "You were with her, then?" "I was." "And what did you say to her?" "Oh, we talked of the illustrious dead of whom that magnificent ruin is a glorious monument!" "Upon my word," cried Albert, "you must have been a very entertaining companion alone, or all but alone, with a beautiful woman in such a place of sentiment as the Colosseum, and yet to find nothing better a talk about than the dead! All I can say is, if ever I should get such a chance, the living should be my theme." "And you will probably find your theme ill-chosen." "But," said Albert, breaking in upon his discourse, "never mind the past; let us only remember the present. Are you not going to keep your promise of introducing me to the fair subject of our remarks?" "Certainly, directly the curtain falls on the stage." "What a confounded time this first act takes. I believe, on my soul, that they never mean to finish it." "Oh, yes, they will; only listen to that charming finale. How exquisitely Coselli sings his part." "But what an awkward, inelegant fellow he is." "Well, then, what do you say to La Specchia? Did you ever see anything more perfect than her acting?" "Why, you know, my dear fellow, when one has been accustomed to Malibran and Sontag, such singers as these don't make the same impression on you they perhaps do on others." 重庆时时彩手机计划app下载手机版下载手机版-- Page 137-- Chapter 37 284 "In ten minutes," said the count to his companion, "we shall be there." He then took Peppino aside, gave him an order in a low voice, and Peppino went away, taking with him a torch, brought with them in the carriage. Five minutes elapsed, during which Franz saw the shepherd going along a narrow path that led over the irregular and broken surface of the Campagna; and finally he disappeared in the midst of the tall red herbage, which seemed like the bristling mane of an enormous lion. "Now," said the count, "let us follow him." Franz and the count in their turn then advanced along the same path, which, at the distance of a hundred paces, led them over a declivity to the bottom of a small valley. They then perceived two men conversing in the obscurity. "Ought we to go on?" asked Franz of the count; "or shall we wait awhile?" "Let us go on; Peppino will have warned the sentry of our coming." One of the two men was Peppino, and the other a bandit on the lookout. Franz and the count advanced, and the bandit saluted them. "Your excellency," said Peppino, addressing the count, "if you will follow me, the opening of the catacombs is close at hand." "Go on, then," replied the count. They came to an opening behind a clump of bushes and in the midst of a pile of rocks, by which a man could scarcely pass. Peppino glided first into this crevice; after they got along a few paces the passage widened. Peppino passed, lighted his torch, and turned to see if they came after him. The count first reached an open space and Franz followed him closely. The passageway sloped in a gentle descent, enlarging as they proceeded; still Franz and the count were compelled to advance in a stooping posture, and were scarcely able to proceed abreast of one another. They went on a hundred and fifty paces in this way, and then were stopped by, "Who comes there?" At the same time they saw the reflection of a torch on a carbine barrel. "A friend!" responded Peppino; and, advancing alone towards the sentry, he said a few words to him in a low tone; and then he, like the first, saluted the nocturnal visitors, making a sign that they might proceed. Behind the sentinel was a staircase with twenty steps. Franz and the count descended these, and found themselves in a mortuary chamber. Five corridors diverged like the rays of a star, and the walls, dug into niches, which were arranged one above the other in the shape of coffins, showed that they were at last in the catacombs. Down one of the corridors, whose extent it was impossible to determine, rays of light were visible. The count laid his hand on Franz's shoulder. "Would you like to see a camp of bandits in repose?" he inquired. "Exceedingly," replied Franz. "Come with me, then. Peppino, put out the torch." Peppino obeyed, and Franz and the count were in utter darkness, except that fifty paces in advance of them a reddish glare, more evident since Peppino had put out his torch, was visible along the wall. They advanced silently, the count guiding Franz as if he had the singular faculty of seeing in the dark. Franz himself, however, saw his way more plainly in proportion as he went on towards the light, which served in some manner as a guide. Three arcades were before them, and the middle one was used as a door. These arcades opened on one side into the corridor where the count and Franz were, and on the other into a large square chamber, entirely surrounded by niches similar to those of which we have spoken. In the midst of this chamber were four stones, which had formerly served as an altar, as was evident from the cross which still surmounted them. A lamp, placed at the base of a pillar, lighted up with its pale and flickering flame the singular scene which presented itself to the eyes of the two visitors concealed in the shadow. A man was seated with his elbow leaning on the column, and was reading with his back turned to the arcades, through the openings of which the newcomers contemplated him. This was the chief of the band, Luigi Vampa. Around him, and in groups, according to their fancy, lying in their mantles, or with their backs against a sort of stone bench, which went all round the columbarium, were to be seen twenty brigands or more, each having his carbine within reach. At the other end, silent, scarcely visible, and like a shadow, was a sentinel, who was walking up and down before a grotto, which was only distinguishable because in that spot the darkness seemed more dense than elsewhere. When the count thought Franz had gazed sufficiently on this 时时彩三星互转二星-- Page 210--


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Chapter 37 278 said Franz, "and desired them to come and inform me of his return." "Ah," replied the duke, "here I think, is one of my servants who is seeking you." The duke was not mistaken; when he saw Franz, the servant came up to him. "Your excellency," he said, "the master of the Hotel de Londres has sent to let you know that a man is waiting for you with a letter from the Viscount of Morcerf." "A letter from the viscount!" exclaimed Franz. "Yes." "And who is the man?" "I do not know." "Why did he not bring it to me here?" "The messenger did not say." "And where is the messenger?" "He went away directly he saw me enter the ball-room to find you." "Oh," said the countess to Franz, "go with all speed -- poor young man! Perhaps some accident has happened to him." "I will hasten," replied Franz. "Shall we see you again to give us any information?" inquired the countess. "Yes, if it is not any serious affair, otherwise I cannot answer as to what I may do myself." "Be prudent, in any event," said the countess. "Oh, pray be assured of that." Franz took his hat and went away in haste. He had sent away his carriage with orders for it to fetch him at two o'clock; fortunately the Palazzo Bracciano, which is on one side in the Corso, and on the other in the Square of the Holy Apostles, is hardly ten minutes' walk from the Hotel de Londres. As he came near the hotel, Franz saw a man in the middle of the street. He had no doubt that it was the messenger from Albert. The man was wrapped up in a large cloak. He went up to him, but, to his extreme astonishment, the stranger first addressed him. "What wants your excellency of me?" inquired the man, retreating a step or two, as if to keep on his guard. "Are not you the person who brought me a letter," inquired Franz, "from the Viscount of Morcerf?" "Your excellency lodges at Pastrini's hotel?" "I do." "Your excellency is the travelling companion of the viscount?" "I am." 重庆时时彩开奖的方式-- Page 215-- -- Page 306-- 感谢贫穷女孩考了7-- Page 64--

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-- Page 83-- 东方时时彩分分彩计划-- Page 97-- Chapter 35 264 "How attentively he looked at you." "At me?" "Yes." -- Albert reflected. "Ah," replied he, sighing, "that is not very surprising; I have been more than a year absent from Paris, and my clothes are of a most antiquated cut; the count takes me for a provincial. The first opportunity you have, undeceive him, I beg, and tell him I am nothing of the kind." Franz smiled; an instant after the count entered. "I am now quite at your service, gentlemen," said he. "The carriage is going one way to the Piazza del Popolo, and we will go another; and, if you please, by the Corso. Take some more of these cigars, M. de Morcerf." "With all my heart," returned Albert; "Italian cigars are horrible. When you come to Paris, I will return all this." "I will not refuse; I intend going there soon, and since you allow me, I will pay you a visit. Come, we have not any time to lose, it is half-past twelve -- let us set off." All three descended; the coachman received his master's orders, and drove down the Via del Babuino. While the three gentlemen walked along the Piazza de Spagni and the Via Frattina, which led directly between the Fiano and Rospoli palaces, Franz's attention was directed towards the windows of that last palace, for he had not forgotten the signal agreed upon between the man in the mantle and the Transtevere peasant. "Which are your windows?" asked he of the count, with as much indifference as he could assume. "The three last," returned he, with a negligence evidently unaffected, for he could not imagine with what intention the question was put. Franz glanced rapidly towards the three windows. The side windows were hung with yellow damask, and the centre one with white damask and a red cross. The man in the mantle had kept his promise to the Transteverin, and there could now be no doubt that he was the count. The three windows were still untenanted. Preparations were making on every side; chairs were placed, scaffolds were raised, and windows were hung with flags. The masks could not appear; the carriages could not move about; but the masks were visible behind the windows, the carriages, and the doors. Franz, Albert, and the count continued to descend the Corso. As they approached the Piazza del Popolo, the crowd became more dense, and above the heads of the multitude two objects were visible: the obelisk, surmounted by a cross, which marks the centre of the square, and in front of the obelisk, at the point where the three streets, del Babuino, del Corso, and di Ripetta, meet, the two uprights of the scaffold, between which glittered the curved knife of the mandaia. At the corner of the street they met the count's steward, who was awaiting his master. The window, let at an exorbitant price, which the count had doubtless wished to conceal from his guests, was on the second floor of the great palace, situated between the Via del Babuino and the Monte Pincio. It consisted, as we have said, of a small dressing-room, opening into a bedroom, and, when the door of communication was shut, the inmates were quite alone. On chairs were laid elegant masquerade costumes of blue and white satin. "As you left the choice of your costumes to me," said the count to the two friends, "I have had these brought, as they will be the most worn this year; and they are most suitable, on account of the confetti (sweetmeats), as they do not show the flour." Franz heard the words of the count but imperfectly, and he perhaps did not fully appreciate this new attention to their wishes; for he was wholly absorbed by the spectacle that the Piazza del Popolo presented, and by the terrible instrument that was in the centre. It was the first time Franz had ever seen a guillotine, -- we say guillotine, because the Roman mandaia is formed on almost the same model as the French instrument.* The knife, which is shaped like a crescent, that cuts with the convex side, falls from a less height, and that is all the difference. Two men, seated on the movable plank on which the victim is laid, were eating their breakfasts, while waiting for the criminal. Their repast consisted apparently of bread and sausages. One of them lifted the plank, took out a flask of wine, drank some, and then passed it to his companion. These two men were the executioner's assistants. At this sight Franz felt the perspiration start forth upon his brow. The prisoners, transported the previous evening from the Carcere Nuovo to the little church of Santa Maria del Popolo, had 用什么软件破解时时彩Chapter 33 238 quadrille to be formed, but the young girl had disappeared. The truth was, that Luigi had not felt the strength to support another such trial, and, half by persuasion and half by force, he had removed Teresa toward another part of the garden. Teresa had yielded in spite of herself, but when she looked at the agitated countenance of the young man, she understood by his silence and trembling voice that something strange was passing within him. She herself was not exempt from internal emotion, and without having done anything wrong, yet fully comprehended that Luigi was right in reproaching her. Why, she did not know, but yet she did not the less feel that these reproaches were merited. However, to Teresa's great astonishment, Luigi remained mute, and not a word escaped his lips the rest of the evening. When the chill of the night had driven away the guests from the gardens, and the gates of the villa were closed on them for the festa in-doors, he took Teresa quite away, and as he left her at her home, he said, -- "`Teresa, what were you thinking of as you danced opposite the young Countess of San-Felice?' -- `I thought,' replied the young girl, with all the frankness of her nature, `that I would give half my life for a costume such as she wore.' "`And what said your cavalier to you?' -- `He said it only depended on myself to have it, and I had only one word to say.' "`He was right,' said Luigi. `Do you desire it as ardently as you say?' -- `Yes.' -- `Well, then, you shall have it!' "The young girl, much astonished, raised her head to look at him, but his face was so gloomy and terrible that her words froze to her lips. As Luigi spoke thus, he left her. Teresa followed him with her eyes into the darkness as long as she could, and when he had quite disappeared, she went into the house with a sigh. "That night a memorable event occurred, due, no doubt, to the imprudence of some servant who had neglected to extinguish the lights. The Villa of San-Felice took fire in the rooms adjoining the very apartment of the lovely Carmela. Awakened in the night by the light of the flames, she sprang out of bed, wrapped herself in a dressing-gown, and attempted to escape by the door, but the corridor by which she hoped to fly was already a prey to the flames. She then returned to her room, calling for help as loudly as she could, when suddenly her window, which was twenty feet from the ground, was opened, a young peasant jumped into the chamber, seized her in his arms, and with superhuman skill and strength conveyed her to the turf of the grass-plot, where she fainted. When she recovered, her father was by her side. All the servants surrounded her, offering her assistance. An entire wing of the villa was burnt down; but what of that, as long as Carmela was safe and uninjured? Her preserver was everywhere sought for, but he did not appear; he was inquired after, but no one had seen him. Carmela was greatly troubled that she had not recognized him. As the count was immensely rich, excepting the danger Carmela had run, -- and the marvellous manner in which she had escaped, made that appear to him rather a favor of providence than a real misfortune, -- the loss occasioned by the conflagration was to him but a trifle. "The next day, at the usual hour, the two young peasants were on the borders of the forest. Luigi arrived first. He came toward Teresa in high spirits, and seemed to have completely forgotten the events of the previous evening. The young girl was very pensive, but seeing Luigi so cheerful, she on her part assumed a smiling air, which was natural to her when she was not excited or in a passion. Luigi took her arm beneath his own, and led her to the door of the grotto. Then he paused. The young girl, perceiving that there was something extraordinary, looked at him steadfastly. `Teresa,' said Luigi, `yesterday evening you told me you would give all the world to have a costume similar to that of the count's daughter.' -- `Yes,' replied Teresa with astonishment; `but I was mad to utter such a wish.' -- `And I replied, "Very well, you shall have it."' -- `Yes,' replied the young girl, whose astonishment increased at every word uttered by Luigi, `but of course your reply was only to please me.' "`I have promised no more than I have given you, Teresa,' said Luigi proudly. `Go into the grotto and dress yourself.' At these words he drew away the stone, and showed Teresa the grotto, lighted up by two wax lights,


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%E7%AC%AC%E4%BA%8C%E5%8D%81%E4%B8%89%E6%9D%A1%09%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E9%87%91%E8%9E%8D%E6%9C%BA%E6%9E%84%E5%BA%94%E5%BD%93%E5%B0%86%E6%9C%AC%E6%9C%BA%E6%9E%84%E5%88%B6%E5%AE%9A%E7%9A%84%E4%BB%8E%E4%B8%9A%E4%BA%BA%E5%91%98%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%BA%E5%AE%88%E5%88%99%E5%8F%8A%E5%85%B6%E7%BB%86%E5%88%99%E6%8A%A5%E9%80%81%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E7%9B%91%E7%9D%A3%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E6%9C%BA%E6%9E%84%EF%BC%8C%E5%B9%B6%E6%AF%8F%E5%B9%B4%E8%87%B3%E5%B0%91%E6%8A%A5%E9%80%81%E4%B8%80%E6%AC%A1%E6%9C%AC%E6%9C%BA%E6%9E%84%E4%BB%8E%E4%B8%9A%E4%BA%BA%E5%91%98%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%BA%E8%AF%84%E4%BC%B0%E6%8A%A5%E5%91%8A%EF%BC%8C%E6%8A%A5%E5%91%8A%E5%BA%94%E8%87%B3%E5%B0%91%E5%8C%85%E6%8B%AC%E6%9C%AC%E6%9C%BA%E6%9E%84%E4%BB%8E%E4%B8%9A%E4%BA%BA%E5%91%98%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%BA%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E7%9A%84%E6%B2%BB%E7%90%86%E6%9E%B6%E6%9E%84%E3%80%81%E5%88%B6%E5%BA%A6%E5%BB%BA%E8%AE%BE%E3%80%81%E4%BB%8E%E4%B8%9A%E4%BA%BA%E5%91%98%E4%B8%8D%E5%BD%93%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%BA%E7%AD%89%E5%86%85%E5%AE%B9%E3%80%82 手机赌博时时彩Chapter 9 73 "I do not know; he is no longer in my hands," replied Villefort. And desirous of putting an end to the interview, he pushed by her, and closed the door, as if to exclude the pain he felt. But remorse is not thus banished; like Virgil's wounded hero, he carried the arrow in his wound, and, arrived at the salon, Villefort uttered a sigh that was almost a sob, and sank into a chair. Then the first pangs of an unending torture seized upon his heart. The man he sacrificed to his ambition, that innocent victim immolated on the altar of his father's faults, appeared to him pale and threatening, leading his affianced bride by the hand, and bringing with him remorse, not such as the ancients figured, furious and terrible, but that slow and consuming agony whose pangs are intensified from hour to hour up to the very moment of death. Then he had a moment's hesitation. He had frequently called for capital punishment on criminals, and owing to his irresistible eloquence they had been condemned, and yet the slightest shadow of remorse had never clouded Villefort's brow, because they were guilty; at least, he believed so; but here was an innocent man whose happiness he had destroyed: in this case he was not the judge, but the executioner. As he thus reflected, he felt the sensation we have described, and which had hitherto been unknown to him, arise in his bosom, and fill him with vague apprehensions. It is thus that a wounded man trembles instinctively at the approach of the finger to his wound until it be healed, but Villefort's was one of those that never close, or if they do, only close to reopen more agonizing than ever. If at this moment the sweet voice of Renee had sounded in his ears pleading for mercy, or the fair Mercedes had entered and said, "In the name of God, I conjure you to restore me my affianced husband," his cold and trembling hands would have signed his release; but no voice broke the stillness of the chamber, and the door was opened only by Villefort's valet, who came to tell him that the travelling carriage was in readiness. Villefort rose, or rather sprang, from his chair, hastily opened one of the drawers of his desk, emptied all the gold it contained into his pocket, stood motionless an instant, his hand pressed to his head, muttered a few inarticulate sounds, and then, perceiving that his servant had placed his cloak on his shoulders, he sprang into the carriage, ordering the postilions to drive to M. de Saint-Meran's. The hapless Dantes was doomed. As the marquis had promised, Villefort found the marquise and Renee in waiting. He started when he saw Renee, for he fancied she was again about to plead for Dantes. Alas, her emotions were wholly personal: she was thinking only of Villefort's departure. She loved Villefort, and he left her at the moment he was about to become her husband. Villefort knew not when he should return, and Renee, far from pleading for Dantes, hated the man whose crime separated her from her lover. Meanwhile what of Mercedes? She had met Fernand at the corner of the Rue de la Loge; she had returned to the Catalans, and had despairingly cast herself on her couch. Fernand, kneeling by her side, took her hand, and covered it with kisses that Mercedes did not even feel. She passed the night thus. The lamp went out for want of oil, but she paid no heed to the darkness, and dawn came, but she knew not that it was day. Grief had made her blind to all but one object -- that was Edmond. "Ah, you are there," said she, at length, turning towards Fernand. "I have not quitted you since yesterday," returned Fernand sorrowfully. M. Morrel had not readily given up the fight. He had learned that Dantes had been taken to prison, and he had gone to all his friends, and the influential persons of the city; but the report was already in circulation that Dantes was arrested as a Bonapartist agent; and as the most sanguine looked upon any attempt of Napoleon to remount the throne as impossible, he met with nothing but refusal, and had returned home in despair, declaring that the matter was serious and that nothing more could be done. -- Page 284-- 高中时时彩15万%E4%B8%AD%E5%9B%BD%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E7%9B%91%E7%9D%A3%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E5%A7%94%E5%91%98%E4%BC%9A%E6%B5%99%E6%B1%9F%E7%9B%91%E7%AE%A1%E5%B1%80%E4%B8%AD%E5%9B%BD%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E7%9B%91%E7%9D%A3%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E5%A7%94%E5%91%98%E4%BC%9A%E5%AE%89%E5%BE%BD%E7%9B%91%E7%AE%A1%E5%B1%80%E4%B8%AD%E5%9B%BD%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E7%9B%91%E7%9D%A3%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E5%A7%94%E5%91%98%E4%BC%9A%E7%A6%8F%E5%BB%BA%E7%9B%91%E7%AE%A1%E5%B1%80%E4%B8%AD%E5%9B%BD%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E7%9B%91%E7%9D%A3%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E5%A7%94%E5%91%98%E4%BC%9A%E6%B1%9F%E8%A5%BF%E7%9B%91%E7%AE%A1%E5%B1%80%E4%B8%AD%E5%9B%BD%E9%93%B6%E8%A1%8C%E4%B8%9A%E7%9B%91%E7%9D%A3%E7%AE%A1%E7%90%86%E5%A7%94%E5%91%98%E4%BC%9A%E5%B1%B1%E4%B8%9C%E7%9B%91%E7%AE%A1%E5%B1%80

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Chapter 44 331 to the house. The man was M. de Villefort; I fully believed that when he went out in the night he would be forced to traverse the whole of the garden alone." "And," asked the count, "did you ever know the name of this woman?" "No, excellency," returned Bertuccio; "you will see that I had no time to learn it." "Go on." "That evening," continued Bertuccio, "I could have killed the procureur, but as I was not sufficiently acquainted with the neighborhood, I was fearful of not killing him on the spot, and that if his cries were overheard I might be taken; so I put it off until the next occasion, and in order that nothing should escape me, I took a chamber looking into the street bordered by the wall of the garden. Three days after, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw a servant on horseback leave the house at full gallop, and take the road to Sevres. I concluded that he was going to Versailles, and I was not deceived. Three hours later, the man returned covered with dust, his errand was performed, and two minutes after, another man on foot, muffled in a mantle, opened the little door of the garden, which he closed after him. I descended rapidly; although I had not seen Villefort's face, I recognized him by the beating of my heart. I crossed the street, and stopped at a post placed at the angle of the wall, and by means of which I had once before looked into the garden. This time I did not content myself with looking, but I took my knife out of my pocket, felt that the point was sharp, and sprang over the wall. My first care was to run to the door; he had left the key in it, taking the simple precaution of turning it twice in the lock. Nothing, then, preventing my escape by this means, I examined the grounds. The garden was long and narrow; a stretch of smooth turf extended down the middle, and at the corners were clumps of trees with thick and massy foliage, that made a background for the shrubs and flowers. In order to go from the door to the house, or from the house to the door, M. de Villefort would be obliged to pass by one of these clumps of trees. "It was the end of September; the wind blew violently. The faint glimpses of the pale moon, hidden momentarily by masses of dark clouds that were sweeping across the sky, whitened the gravel walks that led to the house, but were unable to pierce the obscurity of the thick shrubberies, in which a man could conceal himself without any fear of discovery. I hid myself in the one nearest to the path Villefort must take, and scarcely was I there when, amidst the gusts of wind, I fancied I heard groans; but you know, or rather you do not know, your excellency, that he who is about to commit an assassination fancies that he hears low cries perpetually ringing in his ears. Two hours passed thus, during which I imagined I heard moans repeatedly. Midnight struck. As the last stroke died away, I saw a faint light shine through the windows of the private staircase by which we have just descended. The door opened, and the man in the mantle reappeared. The terrible moment had come, but I had so long been prepared for it that my heart did not fail in the least. I drew my knife from my pocket again, opened it, and made ready to strike. The man in the mantle advanced towards me, but as he drew near I saw that he had a weapon in his hand. I was afraid, not of a struggle, but of a failure. When he was only a few paces from me, I saw that what I had taken for a weapon was only a spade. I was still unable to divine for what reason M. de Villefort had this spade in his hands, when he stopped close to the thicket where I was, glanced round, and began to dig a hole in the earth. I then perceived that he was hiding something under his mantle, which he laid on the grass in order to dig more freely. Then, I confess, curiosity mingled with hatred; I wished to see what Villefort was going to do there, and I remained motionless, holding my breath. Then an idea crossed my mind, which was confirmed when I saw the procureur lift from under his mantle a box, two feet long, and six or eight inches deep. I let him place the box in the hole he had made, then, while he stamped with his feet to remove all traces of his occupation, I rushed on him and plunged my knife into his breast, exclaiming, -- `I am Giovanni Bertuccio; thy death for my brother's; thy treasure for his widow; thou seest that my vengeance is more complete than I had hoped.' I know not if he heard these words; I think he did not, for he fell without a cry. I felt his blood gush over my face, but I was intoxicated, I was delirious, and the blood refreshed, instead of burning me. In a second I had disinterred the box; then, that it might not be known I had done so, I filled up the hole, threw the spade over the wall, and rushed through the 重庆时时彩发号工具-- Page 333-- -- Page 18-- 时时彩后二怎么通杀一码-- Page 271--

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Chapter 33 230 "But if your excellency doubt my veracity" -- "Signor Pastrini," returned Franz, "you are more susceptible than Cassandra, who was a prophetess, and yet no one believed her; while you, at least, are sure of the credence of half your audience. Come, sit down, and tell us all about this Signor Vampa." "I had told your excellency he is the most famous bandit we have had since the days of Mastrilla." "Well, what has this bandit to do with the order I have given the coachman to leave the city by the Porta del Popolo, and to re-enter by the Porta San Giovanni?" "This," replied Signor Pastrini, "that you will go out by one, but I very much doubt your returning by the other." "Why?" asked Franz. "Because, after nightfall, you are not safe fifty yards from the gates." "On your honor is that true?" cried Albert. "Count," returned Signor Pastrini, hurt at Albert's repeated doubts of the truth of his assertions, "I do not say this to you, but to your companion, who knows Rome, and knows, too, that these things are not to be laughed at." "My dear fellow," said Albert, turning to Franz, "here is an admirable adventure; we will fill our carriage with pistols, blunderbusses, and double-barrelled guns. Luigi Vampa comes to take us, and we take him -- we bring him back to Rome, and present him to his holiness the Pope, who asks how he can repay so great a service; then we merely ask for a carriage and a pair of horses, and we see the Carnival in the carriage, and doubtless the Roman people will crown us at the Capitol, and proclaim us, like Curtius and the veiled Horatius, the preservers of their country." Whilst Albert proposed this scheme, Signor Pastrini's face assumed an expression impossible to describe. "And pray," asked Franz, "where are these pistols, blunderbusses, and other deadly weapons with which you intend filling the carriage?" "Not out of my armory, for at Terracina I was plundered even of my hunting-knife." "I shared the same fate at Aquapendente." "Do you know, Signor Pastrini," said Albert, lighting a second cigar at the first, "that this practice is very convenient for bandits, and that it seems to be due to an arrangement of their own." Doubtless Signor Pastrini found this pleasantry compromising, for he only answered half the question, and then he spoke to Franz, as the only one likely to listen with attention. "Your excellency knows that it is not customary to defend yourself when attacked by bandits." "What!" cried Albert, whose courage revolted at the idea of being plundered tamely, "not make any resistance!" "No, for it would be useless. What could you do against a dozen bandits who spring out of some pit, ruin, or aqueduct, and level their pieces at you?" "Eh, parbleu! -- they should kill me." 时时彩个位奇偶算法-- Page 204-- -- Page 32-- 重庆时时彩杀后二-- Page 149--


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-- Page 106-- 时时彩缩水网站Chapter 37 281 filled with gold, said to Franz, -- "I hope you will not offend me by applying to any one but myself." "You see, on the contrary, I come to you first and instantly," replied Franz. "And I thank you; have what you will; "and he made a sign to Franz to take what he pleased. "Is it absolutely necessary, then, to send the money to Luigi Vampa?" asked the young man, looking fixedly in his turn at the count. "Judge for yourself," replied he. "The postscript is explicit." "I think that if you would take the trouble of reflecting, you could find a way of simplifying the negotiation," said Franz. "How so?" returned the count, with surprise. "If we were to go together to Luigi Vampa, I am sure he would not refuse you Albert's freedom." "What influence can I possibly have over a bandit?" "Have you not just rendered him a service that can never be forgotten?" "What is that?" "Have you not saved Peppino's life?" "Well, well," said the count, "who told you that?" "No matter; I know it." The count knit his brows, and remained silent an instant. "And if I went to seek Vampa, would you accompany me?" "If my society would not be disagreeable." "Be it so. It is a lovely night, and a walk without Rome will do us both good." "Shall I take any arms?" "For what purpose?" "Any money?" "It is useless. Where is the man who brought the letter?" "In the street." "He awaits the answer?" "Yes." "I must learn where we are going. I will summon him hither." "It is useless; he would not come up." Chapter 36 274 Tuesday evening, at seven o'clock, descend from your carriage opposite the Via dei Pontefici, and follow the Roman peasant who snatches your torch from you. When you arrive at the first step of the church of San Giacomo, be sure to fasten a knot of rose-colored ribbons to the shoulder of your harlequin costume, in order that you may be recognized. Until then you will not see me. Constancy and Discretion. "Well," asked he, when Franz had finished, "what do you think of that?" "I think that the adventure is assuming a very agreeable appearance." "I think so, also," replied Albert; "and I very much fear you will go alone to the Duke of Bracciano's ball." Franz and Albert had received that morning an invitation from the celebrated Roman banker. "Take care, Albert," said Franz. "All the nobility of Rome will be present, and if your fair incognita belong to the higher class of society, she must go there." "Whether she goes there or not, my opinion is still the same," returned Albert. "You have read the letter?" "Yes." "You know how imperfectly the women of the mezzo cito are educated in Italy?" (This is the name of the lower class.) "Yes." "Well, read the letter again. Look at the writing, and find if you can, any blemish in the language or orthography." (The writing was, in reality, charming, and the orthography irreproachable.) "You are born to good fortune," said Franz, as he returned the letter. "Laugh as much as you will," replied Albert, "I am in love." "You alarm me," cried Franz. "I see that I shall not only go alone to the Duke of Bracciano's, but also return to Florence alone." "If my unknown be as amiable as she is beautiful," said Albert, "I shall fix myself at Rome for six weeks, at least. I adore Rome, and I have always had a great taste for archaeology." "Come, two or three more such adventures, and I do not despair of seeing you a member of the Academy." Doubtless Albert was about to discuss seriously his right to the academic chair when they were informed that dinner was ready. Albert's love had not taken away his appetite. He hastened with Franz to seat himself, free to recommence the discussion after dinner. After dinner, the Count of Monte Cristo was announced. They had not seen him for two days. Signor Pastrini informed them that business had called him to Civita Vecchia. He had started the previous evening, and had only returned an hour since. He was charming. Whether he kept a watch over himself, or whether by accident he did not sound the acrimonious chords that in other circumstances had been touched, he was to-night like everybody else. The man was an enigma to Franz. The count must feel sure that Franz recognized him; and yet he had not let fall a single word indicating any previous acquaintance between them. On his side, however great Franz's desire was to allude to their former interview, the fear of being disagreeable to the man who had loaded him and his friend with kindness prevented him from mentioning it. The count had learned that the two friends had sent to secure a box at the Argentina Theatre, and were told they were all let. In consequence, he brought them the key of his own -- at least such was the apparent motive of his visit. Franz and Albert made some difficulty, alleging their fear of depriving him of it; but the count replied that, as he was going to the Palli Theatre, the box at the Argentina 老时时彩在线预测Chapter 44 328 "It is as I tell you." "Ah, really," said Monte Cristo. "Have you proof of this?" "I had it." "And you have lost it; how stupid!" "Yes; but by careful search it might be recovered." "Really," returned the count, "relate it to me, for it begins to interest me." And the count, humming an air from "Lucia," went to sit down on a bench, while Bertuccio followed him, collecting his thoughts. Bertuccio remained standing before him. Chapter 44 The Vendetta. "At what point shall I begin my story, your excellency?" asked Bertuccio. "Where you please," returned Monte Cristo, "since I know nothing at all of it." "I thought the Abbe Busoni had told your excellency." "Some particulars, doubtless, but that is seven or eight years ago, and I have forgotten them." "Then I can speak without fear of tiring your excellency." "Go on, M. Bertuccio; you will supply the want of the evening papers." "The story begins in 1815." "Ah," said Monte Cristo, "1815 is not yesterday." "No, monsieur, and yet I recollect all things as clearly as if they had happened but then. I had a brother, an elder brother, who was in the service of the emperor; he had become lieutenant in a regiment composed entirely of Corsicans. This brother was my only friend; we became orphans -- I at five, he at eighteen. He brought me up as if I had been his son, and in 1814 he married. When the emperor returned from the Island of Elba, my brother instantly joined the army, was slightly wounded at Waterloo, and retired with the army beyond the Loire." "But that is the history of the Hundred Days, M. Bertuccio," said the count; "unless I am mistaken, it has been already written." "Excuse me, excellency, but these details are necessary, and you promised to be patient." "Go on; I will keep my word."

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Chapter 12 89 informed because the telegraph has told you, three days after the landing, `The usurper has landed at Cannes with several men. He is pursued.' But where is he? what is he doing? You do not know at all, and in this way they will chase him to Paris, without drawing a trigger." "Grenoble and Lyons are faithful cities, and will oppose to him an impassable barrier." "Grenoble will open her gates to him with enthusiasm -- all Lyons will hasten to welcome him. Believe me, we are as well informed as you, and our police are as good as your own. Would you like a proof of it? well, you wished to conceal your journey from me, and yet I knew of your arrival half an hour after you had passed the barrier. You gave your direction to no one but your postilion, yet I have your address, and in proof I am here the very instant you are going to sit at table. Ring, then, if you please, for a second knife, fork, and plate, and we will dine together." "Indeed!" replied Villefort, looking at his father with astonishment, "you really do seem very well informed." "Eh? the thing is simple enough. You who are in power have only the means that money produces -- we who are in expectation, have those which devotion prompts." "Devotion!" said Villefort, with a sneer. "Yes, devotion; for that is, I believe, the phrase for hopeful ambition." And Villefort's father extended his hand to the bell-rope, to summon the servant whom his son had not called. Villefort caught his arm. "Wait, my dear father," said the young man, "one word more." "Say on." "However stupid the royalist police may be, they do know one terrible thing." "What is that?" "The description of the man who, on the morning of the day when General Quesnel disappeared, presented himself at his house." "Oh, the admirable police have found that out, have they? And what may be that description?" "Dark complexion; hair, eyebrows, and whiskers, black; blue frock-coat, buttoned up to the chin; rosette of an officer of the Legion of Honor in his button-hole; a hat with wide brim, and a cane." "Ah, ha, that's it, is it?" said Noirtier; "and why, then, have they not laid hands on him?" "Because yesterday, or the day before, they lost sight of him at the corner of the Rue Coq-Heron." "Didn't I say that your police were good for nothing?" "Yes; but they may catch him yet." "True," said Noirtier, looking carelessly around him, "true, if this person were not on his guard, as he is;" and he added with a smile, "He will consequently make a few changes in his personal appearance." At these words he rose, and put off his frock-coat and cravat, went towards a table on which lay his son's toilet articles, {slink}Chapter 27 183 "True, true!" said Caderousse in a choking voice, "I was there." "And did you not remonstrate against such infamy?" asked the abbe; "if not, you were an accomplice." "Sir," replied Caderousse, "they had made me drink to such an excess that I nearly lost all perception. I had only an indistinct understanding of what was passing around me. I said all that a man in such a state could say; but they both assured me that it was a jest they were carrying on, and perfectly harmless." "Next day -- next day, sir, you must have seen plain enough what they had been doing, yet you said nothing, though you were present when Dantes was arrested." "Yes, sir, I was there, and very anxious to speak; but Danglars restrained me. `If he should really be guilty,' said he, `and did really put in to the Island of Elba; if he is really charged with a letter for the Bonapartist committee at Paris, and if they find this letter upon him, those who have supported him will pass for his accomplices.' I confess I had my fears, in the state in which politics then were, and I held my tongue. It was cowardly, I confess, but it was not criminal." "I understand -- you allowed matters to take their course, that was all." "Yes, sir," answered Caderousse; "and remorse preys on me night and day. I often ask pardon of God, I swear to you, because this action, the only one with which I have seriously to reproach myself in all my life, is no doubt the cause of my abject condition. I am expiating a moment of selfishness, and so I always say to La Carconte, when she complains, `Hold your tongue, woman; it is the will of God.'" And Caderousse bowed his head with every sign of real repentance. "Well, sir," said the abbe, "you have spoken unreservedly; and thus to accuse yourself is to deserve pardon." "Unfortunately, Edmond is dead, and has not pardoned me." "He did not know," said the abbe. "But he knows it all now," interrupted Caderousse; "they say the dead know everything." There was a brief silence; the abbe rose and paced up and down pensively, and then resumed his seat. "You have two or three times mentioned a M. Morrel," he said; "who was he?" "The owner of the Pharaon and patron of Dantes." "And what part did he play in this sad drama?" inquired the abbe. "The part of an honest man, full of courage and real regard. Twenty times he interceded for Edmond. When the emperor returned, he wrote, implored, threatened, and so energetically, that on the second restoration he was persecuted as a Bonapartist. Ten times, as I told you, he came to see Dantes' father, and offered to receive him in his own house; and the night or two before his death, as I have already said, he left his purse on the mantelpiece, with which they paid the old man's debts, and buried him decently; and so Edmond's father died, as he had lived, without doing harm to any one. I have the purse still by me -- a large one, made of red silk." "And," asked the abbe, "is M. Morrel still alive?" "Yes," replied Caderousse. "In that case," replied the abbe, "he should be rich, happy." Chapter 7 61 them." "You are wrong; you should always strive to see clearly around you. You seem a worthy young man; I will depart from the strict line of my duty to aid you in discovering the author of this accusation. Here is the paper; do you know the writing?" As he spoke, Villefort drew the letter from his pocket, and presented it to Dantes. Dantes read it. A cloud passed over his brow as he said, -- "No, monsieur, I do not know the writing, and yet it is tolerably plain. Whoever did it writes well. I am very fortunate," added he, looking gratefully at Villefort, "to be examined by such a man as you; for this envious person is a real enemy." And by the rapid glance that the young man's eyes shot forth, Villefort saw how much energy lay hid beneath this mildness. "Now," said the deputy, "answer me frankly, not as a prisoner to a judge, but as one man to another who takes an interest in him, what truth is there in the accusation contained in this anonymous letter?" And Villefort threw disdainfully on his desk the letter Dantes had just given back to him. "None at all. I will tell you the real facts. I swear by my honor as a sailor, by my love for Mercedes, by the life of my father" -- "Speak, monsieur," said Villefort. Then, internally, "If Renee could see me, I hope she would be satisfied, and would no longer call me a decapitator." "Well, when we quitted Naples, Captain Leclere was attacked with a brain fever. As we had no doctor on board, and he was so anxious to arrive at Elba, that he would not touch at any other port, his disorder rose to such a height, that at the end of the third day, feeling he was dying, he called me to him. `My dear Dantes,' said he, `swear to perform what I am going to tell you, for it is a matter of the deepest importance.' "`I swear, captain,' replied I. "`Well, as after my death the command devolves on you as mate, assume the command, and bear up for the Island of Elba, disembark at Porto-Ferrajo, ask for the grand-marshal, give him this letter -- perhaps they will give you another letter, and charge you with a commission. You will accomplish what I was to have done, and derive all the honor and profit from it.' "`I will do it, captain; but perhaps I shall not be admitted to the grand marshal's presence as easily as you expect?' "`Here is a ring that will obtain audience of him, and remove every difficulty,' said the captain. At these words he gave me a ring. It was time -- two hours after he was delirious; the next day he died." "And what did you do then?" "What I ought to have done, and what every one would have done in my place. Everywhere the last requests of a dying man are sacred; but with a sailor the last requests of his superior are commands. I sailed for the Island of Elba, where I arrived the next day; I ordered everybody to remain on board, and went on shore alone. As I had expected, I found some difficulty in obtaining access to the grand-marshal; but I sent the ring I had received from the captain to him, and was instantly admitted. He questioned me concerning Captain Leclere's death; and, as the latter had told me, gave me a letter to carry on to a person in Paris. I undertook it because it was what my captain had bade me do. I landed here, regulated the affairs of the vessel, and hastened to visit my affianced bride, whom I found more lovely than ever. Thanks to M. Morrel, all the forms were got over; in a word I was, as I told you, at my marriage-feast; and I should have been married in an hour, and to-morrow I intended to start for Paris, had I not been arrested on this charge which you as well as I now {slink}Chapter 16 117 "Since my imprisonment," said Faria, "I have thought over all the most celebrated cases of escape on record. They have rarely been successful. Those that have been crowned with full success have been long meditated upon, and carefully arranged; such, for instance, as the escape of the Duc de Beaufort from the Chateau de Vincennes, that of the Abbe Dubuquoi from For l'Eveque; of Latude from the Bastille. Then there are those for which chance sometimes affords opportunity, and those are the best of all. Let us, therefore, wait patiently for some favorable moment, and when it presents itself, profit by it." "Ah," said Dantes, "you might well endure the tedious delay; you were constantly employed in the task you set yourself, and when weary with toil, you had your hopes to refresh and encourage you." "I assure you," replied the old man, "I did not turn to that source for recreation or support." "What did you do then?" "I wrote or studied." "Were you then permitted the use of pens, ink, and paper?" "Oh, no," answered the abbe; "I had none but what I made for myself." "You made paper, pens and ink?" "Yes." Dantes gazed with admiration, but he had some difficulty in believing. Faria saw this. "When you pay me a visit in my cell, my young friend," said he, "I will show you an entire work, the fruits of the thoughts and reflections of my whole life; many of them meditated over in the shades of the Coloseum at Rome, at the foot of St. Mark's column at Venice, and on the borders of the Arno at Florence, little imagining at the time that they would be arranged in order within the walls of the Chateau d'If. The work I speak of is called `A Treatise on the Possibility of a General Monarchy in Italy,' and will make one large quarto volume." "And on what have you written all this?" "On two of my shirts. I invented a preparation that makes linen as smooth and as easy to write on as parchment." "You are, then, a chemist?" "Somewhat; I know Lavoisier, and was the intimate friend of Cabanis." "But for such a work you must have needed books -- had you any?" "I had nearly five thousand volumes in my library at Rome; but after reading them over many times, I found out that with one hundred and fifty well-chosen books a man possesses, if not a complete summary of all human knowledge, at least all that a man need really know. I devoted three years of my life to reading and studying these one hundred and fifty volumes, till I knew them nearly by heart; so that since I have been in prison, a very slight effort of memory has enabled me to recall their contents as readily as though the pages were open before me. I could recite you the whole of Thucydides, Xenophon, Plutarch, Titus Livius, Tacitus, Strada, Jornandes, Dante, Montaigne, Shaksepeare, Spinoza, Machiavelli, and Bossuet. I name only the most important."

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-- Page 31-- {slink}-- Page 339-- Chapter 7 61 them." "You are wrong; you should always strive to see clearly around you. You seem a worthy young man; I will depart from the strict line of my duty to aid you in discovering the author of this accusation. Here is the paper; do you know the writing?" As he spoke, Villefort drew the letter from his pocket, and presented it to Dantes. Dantes read it. A cloud passed over his brow as he said, -- "No, monsieur, I do not know the writing, and yet it is tolerably plain. Whoever did it writes well. I am very fortunate," added he, looking gratefully at Villefort, "to be examined by such a man as you; for this envious person is a real enemy." And by the rapid glance that the young man's eyes shot forth, Villefort saw how much energy lay hid beneath this mildness. "Now," said the deputy, "answer me frankly, not as a prisoner to a judge, but as one man to another who takes an interest in him, what truth is there in the accusation contained in this anonymous letter?" And Villefort threw disdainfully on his desk the letter Dantes had just given back to him. "None at all. I will tell you the real facts. I swear by my honor as a sailor, by my love for Mercedes, by the life of my father" -- "Speak, monsieur," said Villefort. Then, internally, "If Renee could see me, I hope she would be satisfied, and would no longer call me a decapitator." "Well, when we quitted Naples, Captain Leclere was attacked with a brain fever. As we had no doctor on board, and he was so anxious to arrive at Elba, that he would not touch at any other port, his disorder rose to such a height, that at the end of the third day, feeling he was dying, he called me to him. `My dear Dantes,' said he, `swear to perform what I am going to tell you, for it is a matter of the deepest importance.' "`I swear, captain,' replied I. "`Well, as after my death the command devolves on you as mate, assume the command, and bear up for the Island of Elba, disembark at Porto-Ferrajo, ask for the grand-marshal, give him this letter -- perhaps they will give you another letter, and charge you with a commission. You will accomplish what I was to have done, and derive all the honor and profit from it.' "`I will do it, captain; but perhaps I shall not be admitted to the grand marshal's presence as easily as you expect?' "`Here is a ring that will obtain audience of him, and remove every difficulty,' said the captain. At these words he gave me a ring. It was time -- two hours after he was delirious; the next day he died." "And what did you do then?" "What I ought to have done, and what every one would have done in my place. Everywhere the last requests of a dying man are sacred; but with a sailor the last requests of his superior are commands. I sailed for the Island of Elba, where I arrived the next day; I ordered everybody to remain on board, and went on shore alone. As I had expected, I found some difficulty in obtaining access to the grand-marshal; but I sent the ring I had received from the captain to him, and was instantly admitted. He questioned me concerning Captain Leclere's death; and, as the latter had told me, gave me a letter to carry on to a person in Paris. I undertook it because it was what my captain had bade me do. I landed here, regulated the affairs of the vessel, and hastened to visit my affianced bride, whom I found more lovely than ever. Thanks to M. Morrel, all the forms were got over; in a word I was, as I told you, at my marriage-feast; and I should have been married in an hour, and to-morrow I intended to start for Paris, had I not been arrested on this charge which you as well as I now {slink}Chapter 15 102 Caligula or Nero, those treasure-seekers, those desirers of the impossible, would have accorded to the poor wretch, in exchange for his wealth, the liberty he so earnestly prayed for. But the kings of modern times, restrained by the limits of mere probability, have neither courage nor desire. They fear the ear that hears their orders, and the eye that scrutinizes their actions. Formerly they believed themselves sprung from Jupiter, and shielded by their birth; but nowadays they are not inviolable. It has always been against the policy of despotic governments to suffer the victims of their persecutions to reappear. As the Inquisition rarely allowed its victims to be seen with their limbs distorted and their flesh lacerated by torture, so madness is always concealed in its cell, from whence, should it depart, it is conveyed to some gloomy hospital, where the doctor has no thought for man or mind in the mutilated being the jailer delivers to him. The very madness of the Abbe Faria, gone mad in prison, condemned him to perpetual captivity. The inspector kept his word with Dantes; he examined the register, and found the following note concerning him: -- Edmond Dantes: Violent Bonapartist; took an active part in the return from Elba. The greatest watchfulness and care to be exercised. This note was in a different hand from the rest, which showed that it had been added since his confinement. The inspector could not contend against this accusation; he simply wrote, -- "Nothing to be done." This visit had infused new vigor into Dantes; he had, till then, forgotten the date; but now, with a fragment of plaster, he wrote the date, 30th July, 1816, and made a mark every day, in order not to lose his reckoning again. Days and weeks passed away, then months -- Dantes still waited; he at first expected to be freed in a fortnight. This fortnight expired, he decided that the inspector would do nothing until his return to Paris, and that he would not reach there until his circuit was finished, he therefore fixed three months; three months passed away, then six more. Finally ten months and a half had gone by and no favorable change had taken place, and Dantes began to fancy the inspector's visit but a dream, an illusion of the brain. At the expiration of a year the governor was transferred; he had obtained charge of the fortress at Ham. He took with him several of his subordinates, and amongst them Dantes' jailer. A new governor arrived; it would have been too tedious to acquire the names of the prisoners; he learned their numbers instead. This horrible place contained fifty cells; their inhabitants were designated by the numbers of their cell, and the unhappy young man was no longer called Edmond Dantes -- he was now number 34. Chapter 15 Number 34 and Number 27. Dantes passed through all the stages of torture natural to prisoners in suspense. He was sustained at first by that pride of conscious innocence which is the sequence to hope; then he began to doubt his own innocence, which justified in some measure the governor's belief in his mental alienation; and then, relaxing his sentiment of pride, he addressed his supplications, not to God, but to man. God is always the last resource. Unfortunates, who ought to begin with God, do not have any hope in him till they have exhausted all other means of


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